Archive for April, 2015

Interview with LoveCollide

April 30, 2015

LoveCollide

By Dave Carew 

LoveCollide is easily one of the most talented, engaging, and endearing Christian bands to emerge in years. Formed by two sisters, Lauren and Brooke DeLeary, the band released its acclaimed debut album last year and will be touring extensively this summer and fall. Underground Nashville recently caught up with LoveCollide for this exclusive interview:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: Why did LoveCollide choose to become a Christian, rather than a secular, pop/rock band?   

LOVECOLLIDE: There are several reasons, but the main reason is, when we first started playing music, we actually played “positive secular” music as a pop/rock band. [But] we soon discovered Luke 19:40 to be true. If we don’t cry out, the rocks will. In Hard Rock Cafés and festivals, we found ourselves “preaching” from the stage. We either spouted out Bible verses or just straight-up told people how much Jesus Christ loved them. Naturally, doors in the Christian music arena started opening up, and we really felt God tugging at our hearts to be an overtly Christian band. We obeyed Him and our whole world changed. When we accepted His call and challenge, we felt a peace in our lives like never before. This is where God wants us.

UN: You recently released a short video focused on your desire to try to be authentic human beings. Why did you feel it was important to create that video?  

LC: There is so much that is “fake” today. Especially with social media, it can be difficult to feel like you measure up with what “appears” standard. The reality is none of us are perfect, and that is okay. We want to allow people to see and know that yeah, I struggle and sometimes I don’t feel confident. We all have bad days and things we struggle with. I (Lauren) have anxiety and Brooke struggles with various learning disabilities. We often feel “not good enough,” but we don’t hide our weaknesses. When we are weak, He is strong. In our Father’s eyes we are perfect as he made us.

UN: Do you feel pressure to be role models for your fans?

LC: We feel, as believers, we have the responsibility of letting our light shine to all people. That light being Jesus Christ, at work in us through our music, messaging, and how we live out our lives. So do we feel pressure? Not really. Do we feel responsibility to represent Jesus well? Yes. To our fans? Sure! To all people? Absolutely. We are honored when anyone looks up to us as role models, but we recognize anything good is simply Christ in us.

UN: What are your dreams for the next year?  

LC: We will be at many festivals this summer, and have plans in the fall to tour with The Millennial Tour, produced by the Executive Producer of God’s Not Dead, to equip millennials to own, share, and defend their faith through music and messaging. We plan to finish up the writing for our second record in the fall, and release it in early 2016. We have partnered with OneCry for revival and the Reset Movement.  There are many things developing and God knows our dreams. Our greatest desire is to make Him famous and let him determine what that means for us. 

For more information about LoveCollide, please visit: http://lovecollide.com/

To view LoveCollide’s “Sold Out” video, please visit:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbwNpUEJaJU 

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available from Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

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Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 

 

 

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JT Lewis releases fun, catchy “Shoot Straight” EP

April 27, 2015

JTLewis

By Dave Carew 

There’s a saying in Nashville that goes, “Man, that thing is ready for the Row.” It basically means that song, artist, or musician is primed for success in the country music biz.

“Ready for the Row,” should be the caption under JT Lewis’ life right about now.

In four expertly crafted songs, Lewis’ Shoot Straight EP paints country music as the soundtrack for that uniquely joyous experience grabbed by Southern boys in pick-ups and the girls they adore in lyrics like “God came through / You came true.” These four songs sound and feel like they’d be most at home being belted out by JT from the stage of some massive arena, right before Brad Paisley or Zac Brown hit the stage.

If you love catchy choruses, stick-in-your-head hooks, and the jolt best derived from today’s commercial country music, Shoot Straight needs to hit your iPod soon.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.jtlewismusic.com/ 

To view JT Lewis’ new “Jumpin’ in the Deep End” video, please visit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ya5BlRRCQpc  

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available from Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

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Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

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Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel García Márquez

April 22, 2015

One Hundred Years

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry reviewed books for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to post Mr. Perry’s latest review.

Critics have lauded One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), by Gabriel García Márquez (1927-2014) as one of the greatest novels of the 20th century. A prime example of “magical realism,” the novel chronicles the rise and fall of the Buendía family and the decline and decay of their (fictional) town of Macondo, situated in an unnamed Latin American banana republic bordering the Caribbean.

If read patiently and attentively, One Hundred Years of Solitude is well worth your time. However, I have two problems with this novel. First, the proliferation of characters and the similarity of their names is confusing. We meet José Arcadio Buendía, Colonel Aureliano Buendía, José Arcadio, Aureliano José, Arcadio, Aureliano Segundo, José Arcadio Segundo, a (third) José Arcadio, and two more Aurelianos. A genealogical chart at the beginning of the novel helps mitigate the confusion.

Second, I am not a fan of “magical realism” (a genre in which strange, uncanny things happen to otherwise normal people). For example, Remedios the Beauty ascended, body and soul, into heaven; it rained for four years, eleven months, and two days . . . and did not rain again for ten years. Thirty-two civil wars between Conservatives and Liberals are fought; the matriarch of the family lived to be more than 145 years old; and numerous ghosts and apparitions flit in and out of the story. The novel would have been more believable if Mr. Marquez had stayed with realism and avoided the “magic.”

The novel depicts the dark side of capitalism. A banana company breaks its promises, cheating its workers out of money and benefits. When protesters march into town, the army hems in and machine-guns 3,000 workers, carrying off their bodies on a train and throwing them into the sea. However, one searches in vain in official documents and school textbooks for mention of this horrific event; revisionist historians employed by the republic have erased all mention of the massacre, as if it had never occurred.

Marquez writes not only of “the madness of politics” but also of “the madness of love.” His novel steams with passionate, even desperate and often futile, erotic encounters. The author writes, “He ended up recommending to all of them that wherever they might be they always remember that the past was a lie, that memory has no return, that every spring gone by could never be recovered, and that the wildest and most tenacious love was an ephemeral truth in the end.”

Perhaps you should disregard my criticisms of One Hundred Years of Solitude, for it is indeed a powerful and memorable work of art. Read it for yourself and make your own judgment of its merits.  

ABOUT GABRIEL GARCIA MARQUEZ:     

Gabriel García Marquez was born in Aracataca, Colombia, in 1927; he lived mostly in Mexico and Europe. He attended the University of Botogá and later worked as a reporter and film critic for the Colombian newspaper El Espectador. His books—including Love in the Time of Cholera, The Autumn of the Patriarch, and Chronicle of a Death Foretold—have been published in many languages and are widely praised.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 

 

Tune Ditty Records launched to help indie artists

April 16, 2015

Tune Ditty

by Dave Carew

Recently launched in Nashville, Tune Ditty Records caters to both the independent artist and to the radio stations looking for their music.

The small indie label recently released its debut single, Jack Lawless’ and Rebecca Mae’s “It’s a Good Thing,” which is already receiving airplay around the globe.

Underground Nashville recently caught up with label head Rebecca Martin for this exclusive interview:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: Why was there a strong need for Tune Ditty Records?  

REBECCA MARTIN: There is a need for indie artists to be heard. We found it is easier, from a personal experience, to get a radio station to play a song if it comes from a label rather than an independent person, generally. We also wanted to have a small business that will include a music studio where artists can come record in a comfortable setting for a reasonable price.

UN: Who are the label’s primary artists and what are their credentials?  

RM: Jack Lawless and Rebecca Mae. Jack Lawless has performed across the U.S. and Canada most of his life, opening for major artists like Kenny Rogers, Larry Gatlin, Ray Price, and many others. He has also performed the cruise-ship circuit. Jack is a dynamite entertainer, keeping the crowds wanting more, and being requested for follow-up performances.

Jack has a keen ear for “anything music,” so when you are looking for the best sound on a record, Jack is the man to see. Jack also is a pro graphic designer, designing all Jack Lawless’ and Rebecca Mae’s websites, posters, flyers, album covers, etc.

Rebecca Mae started out winning local and regional music contests, then went on to front her own bands, playing across the U.S., including the American Lawnmower Racing Festival in Virginia and Illinois.

She has played many venues in the Nashville area, with follow-up performances requested.

UN: Do you plan to sign other artists?  

RM: Absolutely! We will be looking for a few other select artists to sign with us when we get our studio up and running in the very near future. We are looking forward to working with a few others to help them further their goals.

UN: What is your dream for Tune Ditty Records?  

RM: We’d like it to become a label that is known for helping indie artists achieve success. We’d like it to be known across the country as the go-to label, not only for the sound quality, but also for [offering] the more relaxed atmosphere that a big label may not have.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.tunedittyrecords.com/ 

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available from Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 

Shantell Ogden releases 4-star follow-up to award-winning album

April 3, 2015

ghosts-in-the-field-shantellogdenjpeg

By Dave Carew 

The beauty of Shantell Ogden’s new album Ghosts in the Field is that it takes the already deep, rich notion of “roots music” (Americana) and poignantly doubles-down on it. This is a roots record about the deep, mystic roots of family, friends, and faith; the “ghosts in the field” are your loved ones living and dead, your memories, the homespun wisdom and decency that others offered as gifts to you, which helped build you. The fact that the album’s seven tracks are also supremely melodic and catchy—sometimes joyfully, sometimes hauntingly—adds another level of richness to an already potent creation.

It’s not easy following up on a record hailed “Best Americana Album of the Year” from the International Music and Entertainment Association (as was Shantell Ogden’s 2013 release Better at Goodbye). But with Ghosts in the Field, Ms. Ogden has risen to the challenge, and then some.

From the title track, which celebrates the specter that is one’s home and past . . . to the perfectly chiseled, poppy anthem “Just a Little” . . . to the reflective, compassionate “Blossom in the Dust”. . . to the R & B/gospel-flavored “As Long as You’re Mine” (which could go toe-to-toe with Eva Cassidy’s version of “People Get Ready”), this album is a gem of musical remembrance, searching, and longing. Shantell Ogden understands how one’s “ghosts in the field” can bring you to places of old shadows and new light. And that musical vision is what makes Ghosts in the Field such an unforgettable new album.

To order Ghosts in the Field or for more information please visit:

http://www.shantellogden.com/

 

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available from Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************ Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew *********** Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/ *********** Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “A Blaze of Glory: A Novel of the Battle of Shiloh” by Jeff Shaara

April 3, 2015

Shiloh

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry reviewed books for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to post Mr. Perry’s latest review.  Dave Carew 

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY: 

Jeff Shaara’s A Blaze of Glory: A Novel of the Battle of Shiloh (2012) narrates in fascinating detail one of the first major battles in the Western Theater of the Civil War. The two-day battle (April 6-7, 1862) involved 44,000 Confederate troops under the command of Albert Sidney Johnston (killed in the battle) and Pierre Beauregard, and 65,000 Union troops under Ulysses S. Grant and Don Carlos Buell.

My wife and I have visited the battlefield twice, and have viewed the old wagon trail (the sunken road), the Hornet’s Nest, the Bloody Pond, the Peach Orchard, and the adjoining cemetery. Our imaginations were challenged to imagine, in such a beautiful place, such a horrendous, bloody battle, which resulted in staggering losses for both sides.

The Battle of Shiloh (a.k.a The Battle of Pittsburg Landing) occurred at Pittsburg Landing in southwestern Tennessee near the banks of the Tennessee River, approximately twenty miles south of Savannah. The Union objective was to continue southward and capture the crucial railroad junction at Corinth, Mississippi. However, the “men in blue” were surprised in their (unfortified) camp by “secesh” forces and were almost destroyed.

One of the biggest blunders of the battle was made by Pierre Beauregard, who took command of the Confederate army after the death of Albert Sidney Johnston. Beauregard, a martinet riddled with egotism and arrogance, gave the bizarre, baffling order to cease the attack with an hour of daylight still remaining. The battered Union army was reinforced during the night and on Monday mounted a successful counterattack, which drove the “men in gray” in retreat back to their fortified base in Corinth.

The Battle of Shiloh resulted in 24,000 casualties (killed, wounded, and missing). In the Western Theater of the Civil War only the Battle of Chickamauga (in northern Georgia) had more casualties. In an especially graphic chapter (Chapter 33), a Union soldier, Fritz “Dutchie” Bauer describes the carnage of the conflict, a gory battlefield named after a small log church named “Shiloh,” meaning, ironically, “A Place of Peace.”

Jeff Shaara brilliantly alternates the chapters between principals from the North and the South, relating not only the various maneuvers (strategies and tactics of battle), but also describing in vivid detail the fury of combat, and providing an inside look at the hopes and fears of the men fighting for survival.

Mr. Shaara has written gripping novels not only about the Civil War but also the Mexican War, the Revolutionary War, and World War II. A Blaze of Glory is, without doubt, one of his best efforts. Highly recommended.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew