Archive for September, 2013

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: T. R. Pearson’s “Cry Me a River”

September 30, 2013

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Editor’s Note:  Roy E. Perry of Nolensville, Tennessee wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than 30 years. Dubbing himself “the amateur philosopher,” Mr. Perry keeps a keen eye on literary and philosophical works of note, and periodically shares his thoughts about them with our readers. In his latest book review, Mr. Perry again spotlights a work by Southern literary artist T.R. Pearson.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

On page 2 of Cry Me a River, T. R. Pearson’s sixth novel, the narrator, a policeman, writes of his small town in eastern Virginia near Roanoke: “Our tragic episode [suggests] that we were, after all, under the surface of things, a community of passionate people who sometimes slaughtered each other for love.” The “tragic episode” refers to the murder of two men, a suicide, and the downfall of a femme fatale who is at the heart of the conflict.

When the narrator’s friend, a fellow police officer, is murdered, police have no clue who did the deed, except for a Polaroid photo of a nude woman, tucked into a fold of the murdered man’s wallet; a suspicious person who has been severely beaten; and a person of interest seen driving a sizable yellow Cadillac sedan.

A French phrase sums up the truth of the case: “Cherchez la femme” (“look for the woman”). The narrator says the woman in question “seemed to have a fairly mystical effect. She occupied a middle ground between belle and slattern, between proper women and sluts. She didn’t attempt to disguise her itch and was hardly ashamed of indulging her urges.” Her magical allure threw a hypnotic spell upon men. It’s no surprise, then, when “you get three boys [young men] like these together with only one girl between them, one of them’s bound to be rubbed raw and find himself set off.”

Cry Me a River contains Mr. Pearson’s signature zany humor, such as Monroe, the narrator’s female mongrel, an extravagantly flatulent and vaporous creature that prefers to dine on rotten food from the dumpster, and Ellis, the town drunk who aspires to be a cop. However, the novel is darker and more serious than the author’s previous offerings.

Although Cry Me a River is entertaining, I have a quibble with this work: its denouement, although plausible, is too pat. The author concocts an easy, convenient way to bring the story to a close. And the final chapter is anticlimactic. But not to worry; anything by T. R. Pearson is worth your time.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

 

 

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Erin McCarley’s “My Stadium Electric”

September 24, 2013

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By Dave Carew

It’s not easy being an alternative rock artist in Nashville, but it’s ground Erin McCarley stakes out masterfully in her second album, My Stadium Electric. The album is well named; from the opening “Elevator” to later stand-outs like “Amber Waves,” this record has a full-throttle, dance-party, mega-stadium vibe to it. That might be annoying or over-the-top if the songs weren’t . . . well, so damn good. So catchy and melodic and vibe-y and danceable.

Because Ms. McCarley’s sound here is so big—so rock-out, rip-it-up—it might be easy to dismiss My Stadium Electric as “just” bouncy dance music or “just” music perfectly designed to open for stadium acts like Coldplay. But that would be a blind dismissal of the forces unleashed here. Ms. McCarley’s music is, in fact, so skillfully crafted that it comes through with a child-like joy garnered from genuine, matured talent. My Stadium Electric is the statement of an artist using her considerable skill as a songwriter to embrace dance and world-music traditions—in a way that is ambitious and big-net—but which also connects personally with the listener, with the part of him or her most receptive to joy and hope and yes-to-life. Anyone wishing to know what the best of alternative rock sounds like in 2013 needs to grab this album now.

Erin McCarley performs at the Southern Ground Music and Food Festival (1st Ave, South & Demonbreun Street in Nashville) this Saturday, September 28.
http://nashville.southerngroundfestival.com/lineup.html

For more information about Erin McCarley, please visit:
http://www.erinmccarley.com/index.html

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Tom Jackson to speak on “How to Stay Relevant in This New Music Industry”

September 19, 2013

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By Dave Carew

If you aren’t attending Indie Connect’s monthly luncheons, you’re missing THE most valuable networking and empowerment gathering for indie singer-songwriters and music-biz professionals. This month’s luncheon will be Thursday, September 26, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Belcourt Taps in Hillsboro Village.

The past speakers at these events have been so interesting that I find myself thinking about their talks for days afterwards. This month, the speaker will be Nashville-based live music producer Tom Jackson (Taylor Swift, The Band Perry, Thompson Square), who will reveal how to stay relevant as an artist and music professional in today’s changing-at-warp-speed world. Mr. Jackson will show that staying relevant isn’t about your age, it’s about who you are as a person—how you think and live. Sharing four key concepts laid out in his book Tom Jackson’s Live Music Method, Mr. Jackson will show how to:

 

  • Understand (and exceed) people’s expectations . . . without changing who you are;
  • Manage fear . . . deal with it . . . and consistently overcome it;
  • Develop confidence, authority, and charisma;
  • Recognize when to take risks . . . and develop the courage to take them.

The cost of the luncheon is $20 if you register by September 23, $25 thereafter and at the door. Your registration fee buys you lunch and a soft drink.

To register for this month’s Indie Connect luncheon, please visit:

http://indieconnect.com/events/monthly-nashville-music-industry-luncheon-2013-09-26/?utm_source=Copy+of+September+9+2013&utm_campaign=Global+Newsletter+030112&utm_medium=email

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: T.R. Pearson’s “Call and Response”

September 16, 2013

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Editor’s Note:  Roy E. Perry of Nolensville, Tennessee wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than 30 years. Dubbing himself “the amateur philosopher,” Mr. Perry keeps a keen eye on literary and philosophical works of note, and periodically shares his thoughts about them with our readers. In his latest book review, Mr. Perry again spotlights a work by Southern literary artist T.R. Pearson.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

In Call and Response (1989)—the fourth volume of T. R. Pearson’s “trilogy plus one” that includes A Short History of a Small Place (1985), Off for the Sweet Hereafter (1986), and The Last of How It Was (1987)—Pearson returns to the fictional town of Neely, North Carolina for more hilarious fun and folly.

As the novel opens, several rednecks go to a striptease show at the county fair, and Nestor Tudor becomes “guardian of the walnut.” (Don’t ask me for the seedy details!).

Meanwhile, a kaleidoscope of other sub-plots bubble up and twirl around . . .

* A self-appointed transcendental guru offers encounter classes to help certain citizens delve, fathom, plumb, and probe more deeply into their psyches, so they can become more spiritually uplifted;

* Mrs. Philip J. King’s menopausal hot and cold flashes make life miserable for her longsuffering husband, who buys a gnome for her yard—a gnome Mrs. King insists she can’t live without, then infuriatingly detests;

* “Raymond,” a smooth-talking city slicker, charms and bamboozles five silly, elderly women into buying unneeded services and then presents them with exorbitant bills.

The plot thickens when Miss Mary Alice Celestine Lefler, a femme fatale who exudes sensual smoke, arrives on the scene and causes the Neely telephones to sizzle with defamatory gossip.

Nestled like Chinese boxes, these and other stories-within-stories regale the reader on virtually every page. Call and Response is the author’s best effort since his stunningly successful debut novel, A Short History of a Small Place. No mean psychologist, T. R. Pearson lays bare the faults, flaws, and foibles of the male and female Neelyites—their conceits, passions, deceits, prejudices, and hypocrisies—all  with side-splitting humor. If you haven’t yet discovered Pearson, you’re missing a treat.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew



Heather Batchelor’s “Fine Line”

September 10, 2013

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by Dave Carew

Sometimes when I see a young artist performing in Nashville, I think, “Man, her voice is so good, so beguiling . . . it’s like she’s just one hit away from big, big things.” That’s precisely what I thought when I saw Heather Batchelor play last month at Belcourt Taps.

Still paying her dues and flying mostly off the radar, Ms. Batchelor has a voice most female artists would die for. Both technically good and hauntingly compelling, it puts across the five songs on her EP Fine Line in a way that makes famous pop artists of her generation (Taylor Swift, Katy Perry) seem down-right uninteresting.

Heather’s voice is the perfect vehicle for her confessional brand of songwriting. “I write from experience,” she recently told Underground Nashville. “Every song contains true details of my life. I take the ugly parts and make them beautiful in some way; and the good parts I just make better . . . . I think the best songs are the ones that are nothing but the truth, where you can live inside every syllable.”

What does she hope that does for the listener?

“I simply hope my music makes people happy, gives them a smile when they need it most,” she responds. “I am always thinking of the best way to connect with my audience, because that's what I do when listening to my favorite artists. I want my listeners to feel included because they are included. I don't just sing for an audience, I sing to them.”

She does, indeed. And the experience is unforgettable.

For more about Heather Batchelor, please visit:

http://www.heatherbatchelormusic.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

New ownership comes to Grounds 4 Inspiration coffeehouse

September 6, 2013

 

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by Dave Carew

Saying she plans to continue “the warm, inviting feel” of Grounds 4 Inspiration coffeehouse, Jennifer Wheeler has assumed ownership of the neighborhood café located in Lenox Village in south Nashville.

“I love the feel of a small, locally-owned coffeehouse, and I’d been looking to own my own business for a while,” says Ms. Wheeler. “When Grounds for Inspiration popped up on a ‘Local Businesses for Sale’ website, I decided to check it out.”

Asked what she might eventually change about the coffeehouse, Ms. Wheeler responded, “From now until the New Year, there won’t be many changes . . . maybe just a menu item or two. After that, I’d like to offer more live music—perhaps on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights, a couple of times a month—and have the music go a little later into the night.”  She also said she hopes to offer more showcases for local painters and other visual artists.

When Underground Nashville interviewed the original owner, Michele Robinette, nearly a year ago, Ms. Robinette said she wanted the coffeehouse to be like the TV show Cheers, “where everybody knows your name.” Affirming the same aspiration, Ms. Wheeler said, “As a customer, I love it when people know my name, and what I like. That’s what we strive for, and our atmosphere is very open and welcoming.

“Oh . . . and one other thing,” she grins mischievously. “The coffee is awesome.”

For more about Grounds 4 Inspiration coffeehouse, please visit:

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Grounds-4-Inspiration/301875156588009?viewer_id=637301939

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

 

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew