Archive for August, 2013

REMINDER — ParkLife Concert to help the homeless

August 30, 2013

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by Dave Carew

If you could take one simple step to help homeless human beings get off the streets and gain a better life . . . would you do it?

Here’s the step:

Please consider attending the ParkLife benefit concert/festival coming to Sevier Park in 12South on Saturday, August 31.  Admission is FREE, with donations of any size enormously appreciated.

How, specifically, will this help the homeless? Your donation will go directly to fund Lambscroft, the local non-profit covered by the Associated Press and The Tennessean, which helps homeless men and women gain a safe, effective pathway off the streets. One key way Lambscroft does this is by offering free culinary-arts (cooking) training to homeless people at its facility called The Cookery on 12th Avenue. Homeless men and women attend the free training school . . . learn how to become cooks and chefs . . . and gain the employment (and other) skills they need to gain a brighter life.

But this training, of course, is only free for the homeless. It costs money to provide it. So that’s where your donation comes in . . . and how you can make a powerful and EMPOWERING difference in the life of human beings working to turn their lives around.

Oh . . . and did I mention there will be great bands there to entertain you? They include:

  • The Choir
  • Neulore
  • Waterdeep
  • The Bobby Hayden Story
  • The Cold Stares
  • Evoka Project
  • Zeb Barron
  • McDarrin Tyler

As the bands play, you’ll enjoy a community cookout, “Bouncy Fun” for the kids, and great food trucks (all of which are tithing a portion of their profits . . . so just by EATING you’ll be contributing!).

Please “Save the Date” (Saturday, August 31, starting at 1 p.m., bands starting at 3:30 p.m.)

For more information, please visit:
http://www.parklife.comsynth.com/

For more information about Lambscroft, please visit:

http://lambscroft.igcphotography.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Concert Review: Judy Rodman and 6Play at Douglas Corner

August 27, 2013

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by Dave Carew

If you live in Nashville for any length of time, you get positively spoiled by the caliber of live music here. You also—just as a matter of pure time management—have to get really selective. Your inbox gets drowned by invitations to shows, and you’re forced to prioritize . . . with most concerts shoved in the mental file labeled “I’d like to if I had the time” and a few into the “I refuse to miss” file.

One show in my “I refuse to miss” file is the every-other-month-or-so concert performance of Judy Rodman and 6Play. What makes this band so special starts with the obvious: top-level Americana music sung and performed by an ACM Award-winning artist and the other consummate professionals in her band. But it goes beyond that. A Judy Rodman concert is not purely about music; it’s about the deeper things music can lead us to: love, deep ties of friendship, the caring and mutually-nurturing community that envelops the artist and her audience. To go to a Judy Rodman concert feels like saying yes to the beauty and power of music, but also to the beauty and power of friendship and to the singular form of grace that radiates from this artist.

In song after song—which, on this night, moved effortlessly across the musical spectrum from country-folk to gospel to Dylan cover (Judy’s hit version of “I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight”) to 6/8 blues to a Steely Dan-esque jazz-pop number—the engagement level and sense of affectionate fun never wavered. In a night of stand-out performances, Eric Normand’s slide guitar solo on the 6/8 blues tune masterfully separated the halves of the show, and signaled compelling and surprising things likely to pop up on the band’s debut album, due in the spring of 2014.

When Judy Rodman accepted her “Best New Female Artist” award from the Academy of Country Music in 1985, few probably envisioned that now, nearly 30 years later, she’d still be in such fine voice, still writing songs that touch people so deeply and that make them—time after time—want to come back for more. But that’s exactly what occurs . . . and why this artist’s shows will be in my “I refuse to miss” file for a long time to come.

For more about Judy Rodman and 6Play, please visit:

http://www.judyrodmanand6play.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew



Shantell Ogden to have song in new movie

August 22, 2013

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by Dave Carew

Shantell Ogden—one of Nashville’s hardest-working and fastest-rising singer-songwriters—is about to have one of her co-written songs appear in a new film.

Entitled “Our American Song,” the tune will appear in writer-director Craig Clyde’s Storm Rider. Mr. Clyde’s most recent credit was for 2010’s A Christmas Wish, telecast nationally on the Hallmark Channel.

Co-written by Shantell, Bill DiLuigi, and Marcum Stewart, “Our American Song” was recorded for the upcoming movie in a Nashville studio. (Determination of time and cable TV channel for the broadcast are pending.)

Shantell, who grew up on a ranch in Utah, noted that the film has particular resonance for her. “I love horses, and the [storyline] takes place, in part, on a ranch with a girl and her horse. It’s a quality, family-friendly film.”

Asked about the career implications of having one of her songs appear in a film, Shantell responded, “As a songwriter, it’s important to me to stay open to possibilities for my songs. To build the kind of career I want, I need to think beyond Nashville and getting songs cut by artists. Discovering and developing relationships in film and TV is becoming a big focus to me in my career, because it’s a whole new market for my songs. I’m really excited about the future!”

To view the trailer for Storm Rider, please visit:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqVzviYBvRQ&feature=youtu.be

For more about Shantell Ogden, please visit:
http://www.shantellogden.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

Book review by Roy E. Perry: T. R. Pearson’s “The Last of How It Was”

August 20, 2013

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Editor’s Note:  Roy E. Perry, the self-proclaimed “amateur philosopher” of Nolensville, TN, wrote book reviews for The Tennessean and Nashville Banner for 30 years. In this new review, Mr. Perry continues his focus on Southern literature published within the past several decades, specifically the work of T.R. Pearson. D.C.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

In The Last of How It Was (1987), the final volume of T. R. Pearson’s trilogy that includes A Short History of a Small Place (1985) and Off for the Sweet Hereafter (1986), narrator Louis Benfield, Jr. relates tall tales—antics, high-jinks, and buffoonery—from his family’s history, as told by Louis’s daddy Louis, with interruptions and corrections from Aunt Sister (Louis’ great-aunt) and Louis’s mother.

Does murder run in the family? Young Louis Benfied, Jr., listens raptly as Daddy and Momma and Aunt Sister discuss. Describing various members of their family tree, Aunt Sister calls their condition “foolishness, a blood thing, wrongheaded plain and simple, misdirected, wild and unmedicated.” Momma prefers to describe it as “passion, temperament, a chemical problem.” Daddy prefers “pigheaded lunacy.”

The main story of this novel concerns an ancestor’s perilous encounter with an Indian who steals his trusty mule, “little Spud,” and the karma that then visits the sneaky thief. Falling victim to a smooth-talking salesman, he winds up with fifteen “Oklahoma hybrid cultivated mules” that actually are scrawny, puny, and not worth a plug nickel. He is proficient in the art of storytelling; each time he tells the mule story, he uses “poetic license” and “pacing and poetical velocity” to embellish and expand the tale’s particulars.

The Last of How It Was is written in a rambling, circuitous style, with rabbit chases popping up without warning—a style that, for some reviewers, is tedious and annoying. Once one gets into the swing of things, however, the diversions and repetitions make one chuckle and then laugh out loud. One discovers a method in T. R. Pearson’s madness, a charming randomness reminiscent of the musings and recollections of a favorite grandparent sitting on the front porch or at the family hearth.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Book review by Roy E. Perry: T. R. Pearson’s “Off for the Sweet Hereafter”

August 9, 2013

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Editor’s Note:  Roy E. Perry, the self-proclaimed “amateur philosopher” of Nolensville, TN—wrote book reviews for The Tennessean and Nashville Banner for 30 years. In this new review, Mr. Perry continues his focus on Southern literature published within the past several decades, specifically the work of T.R. Pearson.

A Review of
T. R. Pearson’s Off for the Sweet Hereafter
by Roy E. Perry

T. R. Pearson’s hilarious debut novel A Short History of a Small Place (1985) was greeted by rave reviews. I gave it five stars out of a possible five. His second published novel, Off for the Sweet Hereafter (1986), falls short of his initial offering. I give it three and a half stars.

As the novel begins, a crime wave breaks out around the tiny town of Neely, North Carolina. The local sheriff describes the spree as “mayhem—pure and undiluted” and “willful, vicious, and heinous.” The “pilfering, plundering, and pillaging” eventually ends in murder.

The perp is one Burton Lynch, a simpleton whose gangly, horse-faced, pointy-nosed appearance reminds Neelyites of a cross between Howdy Doody and Mortimer Snerd. His laconic conversations typically feature a simple “yes” or “no.” The plot thickens when he obtains a large-muzzled Harrington and Richardson Buntline revolver and—to impress a young woman with whom he is obsessively infatuated—sends her newspaper clippings of his felonious career.

At an earlier point in the story, Burton Lynch had met a nymphomaniac aptly named Jane Elizabeth Firesheets, a fiery young woman strikingly endowed by Mother Nature. When, after several months of being separated from her, they meet again, she uses her seductive wiles to encourage Burton Lynch to be “somebody significant and important” by becoming an even bolder and more daring outlaw.

In The Tragedy of Macbeth (Act I, Scene VII), Lady Macbeth, seeking to prod her husband into murdering King Duncan, says to Macbeth, “Screw your courage to the sticking-place / And we’ll not fail.” Jane Elizabeth Firesheets is Burton Lynch’s Lady Macbeth. Initiating a torrid affair, Firesheets seduces her reluctant lover to travel an increasingly violent path, while she herself deviously schemes to escape the tragic consequences of her temptations.

By continuing to chronicle the antics and high-jinks of the quaint and curious people of Neely, North Carolina, Off for the Sweet Hereafter contains some hilarious moments. But it is a darker work than A Short History of a Small Place. The novel may offend some readers because of its steamy erotic scenes and rank dialogue.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Can you make a doggie dream come true?

August 5, 2013

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By Dave Carew

Karin Vilanova and her husband Michael are certified dog nuts. They LOVE our canine friends (and the people they own), and have a dream related to that passion: They want to start a classy, fun, low-stress doggie daycare and cage-free boarding facility just outside Nashville. The only thing standing between them and their dream is the money needed to complete the facility, to be called Dogwood Hollow.

Would you be willing to take 60 seconds to view their fun, entertaining fundraising video?  You’ll find it here:

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dogwood-hollow-a-storybook-resort-for-your-dog-phase-2/x/567182

If you enjoy the video, please share it with your friends and consider donating to Dogwood Hollow and making a dream come true. In a world where dogs, cats, and other animals are treated with great cruelty each day, we need facilities that will treat them with kindness, sensitivity, and the tender love they deserve. That’s what will happen if Dogwood Hollow becomes a reality.

For more information, please visit:

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/dogwood-hollow-a-storybook-resort-for-your-dog-phase-2/x/567182

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

SAVE THE DATE — ParkLife Concert to help the homeless

August 2, 2013

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b
y Dave Carew

If you could take one simple step to help homeless human beings get off the streets and gain a better life . . . would you do it?

Here’s the step:

Please consider attending the ParkLife benefit concert/festival coming to Sevier Park in 12South on Saturday, August 31.  Admission is FREE, with donations of any size enormously appreciated.

How, specifically, will this help the homeless? Your donation will go directly to fund Lambscroft, the local non-profit covered by the Associated Press and The Tennessean, which helps homeless men and women gain a safe, effective pathway off the streets. One key way Lambscroft does this is by offering free culinary-arts (cooking) training to homeless people at its facility called The Cookery on 12th Avenue. Homeless men and women attend the free training school . . . learn how to become cooks and chefs . . . and gain the employment (and other) skills they need to gain a brighter life.

But this training, of course, is only free for the homeless. It costs money to provide it. So that’s where your donation comes in . . . and how you can make a powerful and EMPOWERING difference in the life of human beings working to turn their lives around.

Oh . . . and did I mention there will be great bands there to entertain you? They include:

  • The Choir
  • Neulore
  • Waterdeep
  • The Bobby Hayden Story
  • The Cold Stares
  • Evoka Project
  • Zeb Barron
  • McDarrin Tyler

As the bands play, you’ll enjoy a community cookout, “Bouncy Fun” for the kids, and great food trucks (all of which are tithing a portion of their profits . . . so just by EATING you’ll be contributing!).

Please “Save the Date” (Saturday, August 31, starting at 1 p.m., bands starting at 3:30 p.m.)

For more information, please visit:
http://www.parklife.comsynth.com/

For more information about Lambscroft, please visit:

http://lambscroft.igcphotography.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew