Archive for August, 2012

New music festival to light up Lenox Village

August 30, 2012

by Dave Carew

On Saturday, September 22, from 5-9 p.m., the first-ever Great Food Truck Festival will be presented at Lenox Village in south Nashville.  The all-new music, food, and fun festival will support Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee’s Hunger Action Month.

Live music for the benefit concert will be provided by The Buzz Band, with special guests Three Simple Rules and Akoustyk Fyre.  Collection boxes for Second Harvest Food Bank will be available for donations of unexpired and non-perishable food items. In addition to the cool live music, the benefit/festival will feature 15 great food trucks.

In an email promoting the event, local business owner (Mysteries & More Bookstore) and Lenox Village Area Business Association Representative Greg Bruss said, “This is a first-ever event of this type for our neighborhood and we are expecting 1,000 to 2,000 people.  It will be a fantastic evening of great food and music.”

And for such an excellent cause.  I hope all readers of Underground Nashville will mark their calendars and plan on attending.

For more information, please visit LenoxVillageArea.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

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Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

The Beatles’ “Yesterday and Today” to get Fab treatment

August 28, 2012

by Dave Carew

Taking a page from The Long Players’ playbook, Fab will be at 3rd & Lindsley this Saturday night, playing an entire album front-to-back. The (very cool) selection? The Beatles’ Yesterday and Today.

Some of you Beatlemaniacs (like me) out there may remember that Yesterday and Today was not a “real” Beatles album. It was an American (Capitol Records) creation released largely to take advantage of the enormous (and still enduring) popularity of the song “Yesterday.” So American record execs took that classic, added 10 other songs—several of which were already popular and/or which had been deleted from the American versions of Rubber Soul or Revolver—and voila! Yesterday and Today was born.

The cool thing is, despite its sort of “pseudo-album” status, it’s a great album, and in the hands of Fab—easily one of the best Beatles tribute bands in the world—it should sound particularly affecting. Don’t miss it this Saturday night at 7 p.m. at 3rd & Lindsley.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Interview with Gram Parsons bio author Bob Kealing (Part 2)

August 23, 2012

by Dave Carew

Earlier this week, we posted the first half of our exclusive, two-part interview with Bob Kealing, author of the new book Calling Me Home: Gram Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock. (Please see part one below.) In this second and final installment, Mr. Kealing shares additional insights concerning the visionary musical legacy and contribution of Gram Parsons.

IMPORTANT NOTE: It has just been announced that Mr. Kealing will be signing copies of “Calling Me Home” at 12th & Porter on Saturday, November 3, as part of Gram InterNational V Nashville, the annual concert publicizing the international effort to induct Gram Parsons into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  Why do you feel it has taken nearly 40 years for Gram Parsons’ musical contribution to gain full recognition?

BOB KEALING: People have concentrated on the tragicomic events surrounding Gram’s death. That is a major distraction from Gram’s accomplishments as a pioneering musician. At barely 21 years old, Gram took America‘s most influential and important band of the 1960s [the Byrds] in a bold and risky new creative direction.

Gram never had a hit song, which is why Rolling Stone‘s description of him as the greatest “cult figure” in contemporary music is particularly apt. He also wasn’t the greatest singer or musician. He had a trust fund and a questionable work ethic. That’s all easy fodder for those who are bitter about or jealous of all the post-mortem attention Gram has received. There is always a vocal group of critics who argue Gram doesn’t deserve the attention. All by itself, Emmylou Harris’ 2008 induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame is validation of Gram’s legacy.

UN: What do you believe was the distinct contribution made to contemporary music by Gram Parsons?

BK: Gram was the first “rock” musician to fully embrace country music. Gram wasn’t interested in “countrypolitan.” He performed and wrote full-on “regressive” country, as Emmylou Harris so famously called it. Moreover, he regarded Merle Haggard and George Jones as authentic artists. You have to remember that in 1968—when Gram was championing it—country music was still regarded by many of Gram’s generation as uncool and square. He opened the doors—along with Dylan, Gene Clark, Linda Ronstadt, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and a select group of others—through which came the country-fied Rolling Stones, the Eagles, and ensuing generations of alt-country musicians like Steve Earle, the Jayhawks and Lucinda Williams. Gram also paved the way for outlaw country.

Calling Me Home will be officially published on September 23, but may be pre-ordered now at Amazon.com and other online vendors.


David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Interview with Gram Parsons bio author Bob Kealing (Part 2)

New Gram Parsons book sheds fascinating light on GP’s visionary musical contribution

August 20, 2012

by Dave Carew

For years the debate has raged: What was Gram Parsons’ REAL contribution to contemporary American music? Is he over-rated? Under-rated? Why has the fascination with this thoroughly unique musician—who lived mostly on the periphery of the music scene during his brief 26 years—grown stronger and stronger with each passing year?

A new book, Calling Me Home: Gram Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock by Bob Kealing explores GP’s groundbreaking contribution to American music and culture. Shedding eye-opening new light on GP’s legendary life and career, Mr. Kealing has drawn on dozens of new interviews, uncovering information that even Gram Parsons’ most rabid fans will find fresh and revealing.

In this exclusive two-part interview with Underground Nashville, Mr. Kealing, a central Florida resident, discusses his new book:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: What sparked your initial interest in Gram Parsons?

BOB KEALING: Gram is central-Florida born and spent a lot of his teen years in Winter Haven. The more I dug into this story, the more I realized how Gram is the thread to tell the story of so many important musicians and entertainers who grew up in [central Florida]. The list is long. Add to that Gram’s upbringing—part old South aristocracy, part free-wheeling musician, part trail-blazing visionary, part addicted child of alcoholics—and you have the makings of a fascinating story and cautionary tale.

UN:  Why did you feel there is a critical need for Calling Me Home? What is distinctive about your new book vis a vis other books about Gram Parsons and his music?

BK: In other writings about Parsons, he seems to receive particularly harsh treatment because he overdosed and died young. If time has taught us anything, it’s to blame the addiction, not the addicted. What resulted [in the book], was a cathartic journey tracing the entire arc of Gram’s career, but from a uniquely Southern perspective.

In 2009, at the Newseum in Washington D.C., I uncovered the Ted Polumbaum photos of Gram Parsons at Harvard. This is the first time they’ve been published in a book. I was [also] given the first access to quote from a memoir written by Gram’s little sister Avis. Her words are often heartbreaking. But they clearly spell out how she and Gram felt about their mother, father, and later, their adoptive father.

There are new interviews with key figures in Gram’s career, who’ve been hesitant to speak out: Jim Stafford takes us to the very living room where he gave Gram the advice to pursue country music. Roger McGuinn gives a new take about Gram’s brief but historic time in the Byrds and their landmark album, Sweetheart of the Rodeo. I interviewed a guy who snuck backstage before the Byrds’ performance at the Ryman, and interviewed the Byrds for his college newspaper. He has some keen, up-close insights on Gram’s experiences that historic night.

Part 2 of our exclusive Underground Nashville interview with author Bob Kealing will be posted later this week.

Calling Me Home will be officially published on September 23, but may be pre-ordered now at Amazon.com and other online vendors. 

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

************

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew