Archive for June, 2010

Interview with Lisa Dodson, author of “The Moral Underground: How Ordinary Americans Subvert an Unfair Economy”

June 29, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Middle Tennessee was devastated in May by flooding from which it will take months—in some cases years—to recover. Please join the recovery effort by contacting Hands on Nashville at Hon.org or by calling (in Nashville) 211. Otherwise, please call 800-318-9355. You can also support The Salvation Army’s relief efforts by going to Salarmy-Nashville.com of calling 800-725-2769.  Thank you.

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Interview with Lisa Dodson, author of The Moral Underground: How Ordinary Americans Subvert an Unfair Economy

By Dave Carew

Lisa Dodson is professor of sociology at Boston College.  Her new book, The Moral Underground, focuses on ways in which ordinary citizens try to right wrongs they believe are being perpetrated on their fellow human beings by what Ms. Dodson calls “an unfair economy.” After seeing Ms. Dodson’s book advertised in The Nation, Underground Nashville requested an interview with her, which she graciously granted. Here’s how our conversation went:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  The topic of your book is very distinctive and inspired. What was the “spark” that compelled you to write this book?

LISA DODSON: All my work deals with economic inequality and what that does to people, families, and society. I was going about doing my kind of research… asking regular people about their lives and what they think is going on in terms of the nation’s economy. I try to ask different kinds of people to get an array of perspectives . . . . I expected to get certain kinds of responses, and did; but I also got unexpected ones, too.

This is a society in which many people hold fairness as a value. But over the last 30 years, the disparity of wealth and the erosion of the working and middle classes have permeated everything. Deep inequality is part of everyday life; it infuses all our major institutions.

One finding was that a lot of people really hate unfairness, but, beyond that, say it really undermines their jobs and lives. [So] some will go out of their way and even break rules to try to take the side of people who are working hard but are being hurt by an unfair economy. That was the rock that I turned over unexpectedly and then continued to dig at.

UN:  If you had just 30 seconds to tell someone about your book and how they would benefit from reading it, what would you say?

LD: This book is the people’s take on the economy… not the bankers’ or policy makers’ or politicians’. It goes beyond Wall Street and Main Street. The book invites people from all corners of American life to take a chair at the “head table” and speak up about what they know is happening, how it affects them, and what they would like to see happen. What I hadn’t anticipated is that some of them are already doing it—underground. It’s a wonderful spirit of the American character that Tea Party backers like to push aside. But it’s still there.

UN:  If your book could persuade the U.S. Congress to enact just one piece of legislation, what would you hope it would be?

LD: If I had to pick just one it would be that everyone who is doing the jobs of this nation should make a sustainable income so they can care for their own—not just a wage that works for bottom lines, but a livelihood. It would transform the society in ways that we could not imagine now.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

For more information about The Moral Underground: How Ordinary Americans Subvert an Unfair Economy, visit http://www.thenewpress.com

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Part II – – Interview with Nashville-based photographer Todd Adams (ToddAdams.net)

June 24, 2010

Todd Adams is—far and away—one of Music City’s finest and most well-traveled photographers. In this second and final part of our Underground Nashville interview with him, Todd offers additional detail about the two countries he recently visited and photographed:


UNDERGROUND
NASHVILLE:  What was the most surprising thing to you about Spain and Morocco?

TODD ADAMS: In Spain, I was surprised that my Spanish didn’t seem to be as good as I thought it was (laughs).  In Barcelona, it was the art.  I didn’t know much about the city before I went, but you can see the influence of Picasso, Gaudi, and Miró all over the city.  Overall, I was also surprised by how expensive Spain is.  I had a guidebook, but I still didn’t believe I’d be paying €30 for dinner ($40 at the time, the exchange rate has improved since), but that was pretty common.

In Morocco, I was surprised and a little exasperated at how much it seemed like everyone around me was trying to hustle something.  It got to be a little exhausting.  We ended up getting taken a bit by a guy in Tangiers who claimed he was a taxi driver, but really he was just an “unofficial guide,” who ended up wanting to take us to several shops where he’d get a commission.  I even knew this scam, but got deceived by him telling us he was a taxi driver.  We ended up paying him a small sum to go away.

But on a positive note, Morocco was scenically gorgeous, had an intoxicating exotic feel, the prices were low, and people were generally friendly and interested in talking with tourists.  I’d like to go back when I have more time to explore other areas of the country. I didn’t get to see the oceanfront, the desert, or any Kasbahs.  I really just scratched the surface.

UN: Your photos from the trip now are posted at Toddadams.net.  How can people most easily view or purchase one or more photos?

TA: My best photos are in my wallpaper section.  I sell my photos both as prints for individual buyers and as hi-res electronic images for commercial licensing.  Either one can be arranged by e-mailing me, and my e-mail address is on the website.

UN: Is there anything else you’d like to say, that wasn’t covered by one of my questions?

TA: As always, I’d tell people who see my photos and think they’d like to go to one of these places, they should.  It’s a rewarding, educational experience that always increases my understanding of the world in so many ways.  The biggest step is just buying the plane ticket.

To view Todd’s photos of Spain and Morocco, visit ToddAdams.net and then click on “New Wallpapers.”

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

Interview with Nashville-based photographer Todd Adams (ToddAdams.net)

June 22, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Middle Tennessee has been devastated by flooding from which it will take months—in some cases years—to recover. Please join the recovery effort by contacting Hands on Nashville at Hon.org or by calling (in Nashville) 211. Otherwise, please call 800-318-9355. You can also support The Salvation Army’s relief efforts by going to Salarmy-Nashville.com of calling 800-725-2769.  Thank you.

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Interview with Nashville-based photographer
Todd Adams (ToddAdams.net)

For my money, Todd Adams is easily one of the finest—and still most underappreciated—photographers in Nashville.  For the past decade or more, Todd has devoted his vacation time to taking incredible trips abroad—and then presenting spectacular photographic records of them.  I personally have some of Todd’s evocative photos from Ireland and Italy on the mantle of my fireplace, and he has sold many others to clients around the world.

Underground Nashville caught up with Todd to interview him about his recent trip to Spain and Morocco.  Part I of our interview follows; Part II will be posted later this week.

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLEWhy did you choose to visit and photograph Spain and Morocco this time? What was compelling to you about those particular countries?

TODD ADAMS:  I’ve got a very long list of places I’ve seen or read about which I’d like to photograph.  Southern Spain, medieval Andalucia, is one of those places I’ve had on my list for years.  The old town of Ronda is just one of the most picturesque places in Europe.  It was immortalized by Hemingway and it’s the birthplace of bullfighting.  So there was just a lot there that seemed significant and photographic.

This last trip really just started off being a trip to Spain.  My nephew accompanied me on this one and for him it was a chance to go see a soccer game in Barcelona (which was great, Barcelona won 2-0).  For me, the proximity of Morocco to Spain made it compelling to do a few days there also.  I had never been anywhere in Africa, nor in an Islamic culture.  And Morocco is a very easy introduction to both, as well as having a lot of photographic opportunities.

UN: In your opinion, what is the MOST important reason why someone should visit these countries?

TA: For Spain, if you like history, good food, lots of art, a laid-back lifestyle, and lots of sun and fun, it’s a natural choice. Barcelona is one of the most art-filled cities I’ve ever been to.  It’s all around you. Southern Spain has that true Mediterranean feel.  And it’s all a great cultural experience.

Morocco may be a bit more challenging for some, but if you don’t mind the language barrier, it’s a great experience for someone looking for something a little more exotic.  Being that it’s so close to Europe, yet culturally a world away, it’s bound to be tempting to any adventure traveler.

To view Todd’s photos of Spain and Morocco, visit ToddAdams.net and then click on “New Wallpapers.”

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

Interview with Dr. Steve Dickerson, GOP candidate for Tennessee State Senate, District 21

June 17, 2010

Before moving to Nashville in 1996, Dr. Steve Dickerson performed his residency in anesthesiology at the University of South Florida, acting as chief resident during his final year.  Dr. Dickerson’s practice has since grown to ten physicians.  He currently serves as chairman of the board of trustees at the Middle Tennessee School of Anesthesia and, in 2009, was appointed by Gov. Bredesen to the Tennessee Board of Medical Laboratories, a position he resigned to run for the state senate as a Republican, District 21.  An avid guitar player, Dr. Dickerson has played in a band with Grammy-nominated artist Duncan Sheik and currently plays lead guitar in the local band No Good Deed.

Dr. Dickerson recently granted Underground Nashville the following interview:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  What compelled you to run for the Tennessee state Senate at this particular time? What problems are you especially driven to help solve?

STEVEN DICKERSON: Like many Tennesseans, I have had a growing sense of unease about the future of our state and nation. Over time, I realized my unease was really a concern about opportunity. I am a candidate for the state senate because I believe, unless we act now, the opportunities available to the Tennesseans of tomorrow will be less than those available today.

There is an inverse correlation between the size of government and individual opportunity. As government takes on a larger role in society, individuals, and the opportunities available to them, diminish.

As a state senator, I will act to responsibly constrain the size and scope of our state government and limit its role to serving functions that are absolutely necessary. By so doing, Tennesseans will be empowered to live, work, and prosper in a state and nation where they have more opportunity, not less.

UN: Why do you believe GOP primary voters should vote for you on August 5, rather than your opponent, Mr. Chesser?

SD: Healthcare will be one of the defining issues facing our state over the next decade. How healthcare is handled by our General Assembly will impact our economy, our privacy and, of course, our health.  If elected to the state senate, I would be the only senator who was also a physician. In that capacity, I would be able to use my medical experience to help author and guide legislation to enhance access to healthcare, improve its quality, and do so in a fiscally responsible manner.

Moreover, being a physician has uniquely prepared me to deal with legislative decision-making. Legislators across our nation shy away from making decisions that cause short-term pain while providing long-term benefit. They are more concerned about the next election rather than the next generation. As a physician, I make decisions on a daily basis that are based on long-term benefit, though they may result in short-term discomfort. I will apply that same sort of decision making to legislation.

UN:  If you are successful in the GOP primary, and face Democratic Senator Doug Henry in the fall, what in Sen. Henry’s record will you most take exception with?

SD: Senator Henry has served his district with singular distinction and honor since 1955. However, I believe this campaign is about the future. Many of the problems facing our district, our state, and our nation result from a business-as-usual mentality of those in government. They see government as the solution to problems rather than an impediment to individuals and communities finding their own solutions.

Now is the time to elect leaders who will bring a fresh perspective about government, and the limitations about what government can and should do, to our General Assembly. It is only natural for leaders who have supported and authored legislation to have a certain sense of ownership in the status quo. After all, they are part of it. I think we can and must do better than the status quo. Now is the time to elect a new generation of leaders.

For more information, visit VoteDickerson.com.

Note: Dr. Dickerson’s opponent in the upcoming GOP state Senate primary, James Chesser, was interviewed by ‘Underground Nashville’ last week. Current state Senator Douglas Henry and his Democratic primary opponent, Jeff Yarbro, also have received interview invitations.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Part II – – Interview with James Chesser, GOP candidate for Tennessee State Senate, District 21

June 15, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

************

Middle Tennessee has been devastated by flooding from which it will take months—in some cases years—to recover. Please join the recovery effort by contacting Hands on Nashville at Hon.org or by calling (in Nashville) 211. Otherwise, please call 800-318-9355. You can also support The Salvation Army’s relief efforts by going to Salarmy-Nashville.com of calling 800-725-2769.  Thank you.

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Part II  – – Interview with James Chesser, GOP candidate for Tennessee State Senate, District 21

By Dave Carew

Last week we ran Part I of our interview with GOP state senate candidate James Chesser.  Part II immediately follows. Mr. Chesser and Dr. Steve Dickerson are the two Republican candidates in the August 5 state senate primary for District 21 (Nashville), each of whom is ultimately seeking to unseat incumbent Democratic state Senator Douglas Henry (or Jeff Yarbro, should Mr. Yarbro pull off an upset win) in the general election in the fall.

Mr. Chesser is President of Chesser & Associates, P.C., and ProWorld.com of Nashville, which offer legal and consulting services to international professionals and entertainment firms. In this second and final installment of our interview with him, Mr. Chesser discusses what he believes would be the tangible impact on his district should he be elected to the Tennessee state senate in November.

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  If you are successful in the GOP primary, and face Democratic Senator Doug Henry in the fall, what in Sen. Henry’s record will you most take exception to?  How will you present yourself as an alternative?

JAMES CHESSER: Senator Henry enjoyed a distinguished career as a civil servant who cared about people, voted his conscience, and was fiscally conservative.    But the world has changed in the past half century, and truly representative democracy survives only through fresh energy, new ideas, and ever greater participation of citizens.    We are facing critical challenges in Tennessee in the next four years, not only in issues such as budgets, jobs, education, healthcare, immigration, and crime but also in our distrust of the ‘business as usual’ approach to government, and its ability to connect with everyday people.  We need to build new bridges between community and government, and to empower and engage more citizens.  It takes good community to make government work, and, if elected, I intend to give a greater voice to those who are building this community.

UN:  How would you do that?

JC: I intend to promote volunteerism, and to serve as a participating leader, physically as well as administratively working with our residents, to ensure that their voices are as powerful as any lobbyist or corporation.   I offer my services humbly to build on the work Senator Henry has started, not to undo it.   And I want to give America back to the common man—starting right here in Senate District 21, Tennessee–and make our district a model for locally driven conservative government that provides a real future for us.

For more information, see ChesserforTNsenate.com.

Note:  Mr. Chesser’s opponent in the upcoming GOP State Senate primary, Dr. Steve Dickerson, also has received an interview invitation, as have Democrats Douglas Henry and Jeff Yarbro.


David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Interview with James Chesser, GOP candidate for Tennessee State Senate, District 21

June 10, 2010

Interview with James Chesser, GOP candidate for
Tennessee State Senate, District 21

James Chesser is President of Chesser & Associates, P.C., and ProWorld.com of Nashville, which offer legal and consulting services to international professionals and entertainment firms. Mr. Chesser also is a charity and civic director, church elder, husband, and father who has actively served the Nashville community for the past twenty-four years.

A passionately committed conservative who ardently believes “that government is best which governs least,” Mr. Chesser is vying for the Republican nomination for Tennessee State Senate, District 21, against Dr. Steve Dickerson. The Republican primary will be held on Tuesday, August 5.  The winner of the primary will face either long-term Democratic state Senator Douglas Henry or his challenger, Jeff Yarbro.

Part I of our interview with Mr. Chesser follows:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  In announcing your candidacy, you stated, “We’re all about a simple message: ‘Community Driven Government; Smaller, Smarter, and Constitutional.’ How would such government affect the average voter in your district? How would he or she benefit from it?

JAMES CHESSER: This message, which came from our Founding Fathers, ultimately leads to a government that works better for us.   For average voters, it leads to jobs from advanced technology and world-class education for their children; greater volunteerism and lower government expenses; common sense legislation and lower taxes; stronger voices for our residents rather than the lobbyists; and new respect for the average man and woman.   It breaks the cycle of government-driven community, and offers an inspiring model that could, in years ahead, set the standard for other counties and states.  For one small corner of Davidson County—District 21—we set the stage for truly giving America back to America.

Government should serve the people it represents, engage them, and respect them.    However, when government is influenced by special interests and representatives of financial concerns separated from the community, a conflict occurs.  Government cannot serve two masters.   Truly representative government must be directed by people who are closest to the problems, solutions, and hopes of their community.   It must constantly explore new ways to harness the energy, ideas, and leadership of its key participants—professionals and small business owners, churches, civic leagues, charities, universities, and the like.

Through locally driven government we can empower speaking out, volunteerism, and a new respect for inalienable rights.   The voices of common sense, practical experience, and financial accountability are inherently local.  These voices naturally limit regulation, taxation, and administrative arrogance.

Although government provides infrastructure, protections, and opportunities that are essential to economic growth, it should not grow so large as to compete with or replace the voice of any community.  Communities produce the creative, moral, and economic energy which build better lives—not government.   We should, therefore, respect individual choices and decisions of local residents, as guaranteed in our federal and state Constitutions.   Least government is best.   Smaller governments serve communities well because they are manageable and responsive.   Their costs seldom hinder economic growth or personal liberties.

UN: If you had the length of an elevator ride to convince a GOP primary voter to vote for you rather than your opponent, Dr. Dickerson, what would you say?

JC: [This] is a critical election for our community and I want your vote.  I love this district and am proud of our state; but we’re in trouble.  We need fresh energy and new ideas in the legislature.  The world is racing past us, and we’re finishing poorly in so many areas: well-paying jobs, education, balancing our budgets, taxes, healthcare, crime….  People are losing their voice, as well as their homes, and believe government’s broken and can’t be fixed.  Now, I’m not a politician, but I want to help.  I’m a committed conservative who is one of you—a business owner, military officer, church elder, charity and civic director, and husband and father.   For twenty-four years I’ve represented many voices in this community.

My formal studies have included physics, engineering, and law.  In my law practice, I’ve helped small overseas businesses establish branch offices and jobs in Tennessee.  I’ve represented universities; churches; entertainers; medical and legal professionals; immigrants; and families with long ties to Tennessee.  I’ve fought with almost every federal and state government agency, so I know how government works and how it doesn’t work.  But the skill I’m proudest of is bridge building:  I’ve learned how to bring disagreeing parties together.  My dream is for a new type of locally driven government; smaller, smarter, constitutional.  One that empowers the voice again of the common man, common sense, and common heart.  One that encourages volunteerism, and respect for the Constitution.  I want to give America back to America, starting right here in one small corner of Davidson County, Tennessee.  And in years we will be the model against which other counties and even states will measure themselves.   Can I count on your support?

For more information, see ChesserforTNsenate.com.

Note:  Mr. Chesser’s opponent in the upcoming GOP state senate primary, Dr. Steve Dickerson, also has received an interview invitation, as has Senator Henry and Jeff Yarbro.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Hanging with Rosie Flores before the gig

June 8, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

************

Middle Tennessee has been devastated by flooding from which it will take months—in some cases years—to recover. Please join the recovery effort by contacting Hands on Nashville at Hon.org or by calling (in Nashville) 211. Otherwise, please call 800-318-9355. You can also support The Salvation Army’s relief efforts by going to Salarmy-Nashville.com of calling 800-725-2769.  Thank you.

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Hanging with Rosie Flores before the gig

By Dave Carew

So I meet Rosie Flores and three mutual friends and it’s two hours before her unannounced gig at Layla’s Bluegrass Inn down on Lower Broadway and suddenly Rosie no longer is a cult figure I’ve merely heard about for twenty years, but a real person . .  and she has broken her left arm and is telling us, at dinner at the Japanese restaurant in Cummins Station, that she did it be falling out of bed after she thought she heard a mouse on her bed… and two other people at dinner are my friend Rachel Gladstone of The Petty Chronicles (novel and play) fame and the famous photographer and magazine publisher, Raeanne Rubenstein, who—among many other things—took the photo of Gram Parsons that, nearly forty years later, became the cover of the best Gram Parsons biography, Twenty Thousand Roads . . . and then we’re all laughing—slyly and quietly, so as to not be heard or seem offensive—at how cheerily abysmal our Japanese waiter is . . . and I crack sotto voce that he must believe in the installment plan, because our meals arrive at completely random intervals and in completely random parts, such that we all end up eating everything at completely different times.

Then, later, at 9 p.m., we are at Rosie’s gig on Lower Broadway and the night is warm and humid and evocative and the streets are teeming with random faces and the band is playing the best rockabilly you’ve ever heard—with Gail Davies’ son Chris Scruggs on lead guitar in his Buddy Holly-esque glasses and rolled-up-cuff ‘50s greaser jeans—and he’s just knocking every riff out of the park and Rosie is fantastic and the completely-unannounced gig  soon is packed and then two hours go by in this phantasmal rockabilly dream.

Later, I am alone on the hot, larval, midnight-swimming streets of Nashville and everything is so lit and shadowed and full-of-life that I am thinking, “This is bright lights, big city. That is exactly what people the world over IMAGINE Nashville is. The city has become its own dream.”

Coming soon in “Underground Nashville”: an interview with Rosie Flores.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Part II – – Interview with the “Couchcast” dudes

June 3, 2010

It was a real struggle, but I got the three “Couchcast” dudes off the couch one more time—for what seemed like an endless two minutes to them—so they could complete their interview with “Underground Nashville.”   Part II of the interview is below.

“Couchcast” is a regular podcast featuring Vince Gaetano, Nick Benson, and Kenny Fisch, who have never once referred to themselves as “the three amigos.” You can listen to past and future shows at couchcast.wordpress.com. The guys’ latest installment, “Robbing from Kevin Costner,” finds them talking about Robin Hood and offering their edgy, off-beat predictions about Prince of Persia.

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: How is your “Couchcast” podcast distinct from Roger Ebert-style movie-review shows we’re accustomed to?

VINCE GAETANO: Well, for starters, I don’t consider “Couchcast” to be a review show. That is to say, reviewing movies isn’t our main goal. Really, it’s just our take on the movie business—our opinions presented in a light-hearted manner with the occasional fart joke thrown in to get a laugh. That, I suppose, would be the core difference: We don’t put entertainment above or below information. We keep it as equal as possible. Now, whether or not people actually find us funny is neither here nor there. The point is, we’re trying.

NICK BENSON: First of all, it’s a show. Most movie reviews are written and then you have to read them, which is really un-American if you ask me. Speaking of fascism, Roger Ebert and Peter Travers are the two primary movie reviewers of our time, and they are also like 90 years old. So our podcast is a bit more down-to-earth and accessible to a younger audience. We are not really telling you what to watch or getting all artsy on your ass. We are just having a conversation about movies and hope that the listener will be able to form their own opinion based on what we discuss. We don’t take it too seriously and we are certainly not above anyone’s heads. If anything we are very, very beneath you.

KENNY FISCH: I’ve never seen Roger Ebert review anything, so I assume our show is much different than his.


UN: What do you hope listeners will get out of each podcast?

VINCE: In a word, fun. Honestly, we didn’t start this podcast to change anything. We’re not trying to make any sort of impact. Most of the time, we’re not being serious. We’re just having a good time. And we hope you’re having one, too.

NICK: I hope that they will have fun and get a laugh. That’s the primary purpose of any form of entertainment: enjoyment. A bonus would be if they get some useful information out of it. It’s just another place to go to for some information on movies. I’d like people to be able to start e-mailing us and saying, “Hey, I actually really liked Avatar and you and Vince can go blow me.”

KENNY: I hope they have a good time, a couple of laughs, and [that they] don’t unsubscribe. Even if they think it’s stupid, in the end, at least it’s different than other reviews.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.