EP Review: Steve Dorian’s “Living”

August 5, 2016

stevedorian2_small

by Dave Carew

“Wow! I REALLY like this record!” my sister said excitedly, as she and I recently cruised in her pickup truck through the Berkshires. “What’s this guy done so far? He’s EASILY as good as anything I hear on country radio—and WAY BETTER than most of it!”

My sister’s spontaneous enthusiasm was for Steve Dorian’s Living, a 6-song EP by the fast-rising new country artist. And although I’m more of a pop/rock than country fan, even these old ears could hear the superiority of Living over virtually anything else heading out of Music Row these days.

The EP’s first track is “Full Moon Feelin’,” a song so catchy, memorable, and radio-ready it could easily have been the single pitched to radio. (The actual track that was, “Edge of 18,” recently has been performed by Dorian on Nashville TV’s More at Midday and elsewhere.) From there, the EP moves compellingly from “Wish I Woulda Let Ya” to “Something So Beautiful” to “Can Always Tell” to the final track, “Running Red Lights,” a culminating tune that richly demonstrates Dorian’s outstanding ability to riff off and magically spin a conventional phrase, creating something uniquely engaging and heartfelt in his wake.

If you visit Steve Dorian’s website (which I urge you to do—the link is below), you get the immediate impression that this is an artist about to break through in a big way. When you listen to Living, you see—or, rather, hear—exactly why that breakthrough should be imminent. In a time when country radio is increasingly unsatisfying and adrift, there’s an artist with the goods to turn that around and open up new vistas for a time-honored brand of American music. That artist’s name is Steve Dorian.

For more about Steve Dorian, please visit:

http://www.stevedorian.com/
 

David M. (Dave) Carew is the acclaimed author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

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Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit Amazon.com and/or the page on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EverythingMeansNothingtoMe?ref=ts&fref=ts

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Land a quality job faster with Kurt Kirton’s excellent new guide

January 20, 2016

Cover-Front_7-15-15RGB_nobleed72dpi

By Dave Carew

One of the most distressing and dispiriting things that can happen to any human being is to not be able to find a good job. Sadly, the post-Great Recession economy has made this situation more commonplace, with everyone from seniors in college to senior citizens wondering, How am I going to land a good job in this new environment? Or land another one if I’m layed off? (Today’s 5 percent unemployment rate, while certainly welcome, masks deep structural shifts in the economy that have made searching for a quality job far more difficult and frustrating for millions.)

Kurt Kirton offers an empowering solution in his outstanding new guide Here Today, Hired Tomorrow: A Practical Guide to Getting the Job You Want Fast. In crisp, clear—even comforting—English, Kurt spells out exactly what you must do to move confidently forward. Among the crucial topics Kurt helps you with are:

  • How to create your strategic job-search action plan;
  • Targeted networking . . . exactly what you must do to maximize its power in your job search;
  • The things you MUST know about networking events and applying for jobs;
  • Interviewing: What really are the secrets of doing it right?
  • Secrets of negotiating and accepting a position.

You’ll also learn exactly how to break through to insiders at your target companies, and streamline your efforts using time-saving scripts, templates, and quick lists.

I can’t put it more succinctly than this: If you want an interesting, fulfilling job—but don’t how to move toward it confidently, competently, and quickly—grab your copy of Here Today, Hired Tomorrow. But don’t do it today or tomorrow. Do it yesterday.

PRAISE FOR HERE TODAY, HIRED TOMORROW: 

“As a recruiter with a career spanning over 30 years, my hat is off to Kurt Kirton . . . He has taken the overwhelming task of job-searching and broken it down to be so user-friendly and so unintimidating that he does not overwhelm his reader. Rather, he gives the reader a sense of ‘I can do this.’ . . . I will recommend this book not only to job-seekers, but to coaches, mentors, and other recruiters. It is a real ‘find.’”

— Layne Cagle, Partner and Recruiter, Vaco Staffing 

TO ORDER OR FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: http://www.kurtkirton.com/hthtbook/ 

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of ”Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels ”Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and ”Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

 

 

Book review by Roy E. Perry: “The Smoke at Dawn: A Novel of the Civil War”

November 4, 2015

Shaara

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry reviewed books for ”The Tennessean” and ”Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. ”Underground Nashville” is always proud to post Mr. Perry’s latest book review.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

Jeff Shaara’s new series of Civil War novels includes A Blaze of Glory (the Battle of Shiloh; 2012); A Chain of Thunder (the Siege of Vicksburg; 2013); The Smoke at Dawn (the Battle of Chattanooga; 2014); and The Fateful Lightning (Sherman’s capture of Atlanta and his march to the sea; 2015).

The Smoke at Dawn begins with the Battle of Chickamauga, the worst defeat suffered by the Army of the Cumberland. In Chapter One, as Union soldiers retreat out of north Georgia back toward Chattanooga, Nathan Bedford Forrest berates Gen. Braxton Bragg for his refusal to pursue the enemy ruthlessly, thereby losing a great opportunity for the Confederate army.

With the Union army bottled up in Chattanooga by a siege that threatens its starvation, Ulysses S. Grant, the victor at Fort Donelson, Shiloh (with Buell’s help), and Vicksburg, is elevated to the lofty position as commander of the entire region west of the Appalachians. It will take Grant’s expertise to help the fly escape from the fly bottle.

The forty-one remaining chapters of this novel alternate between principals of both North and South—for the South, Nathan Bedford Forrest, Braxton Bragg, and Patrick Cleburne; for the North, George Thomas, Private Fritz “Dutchie” Bauer, William Tecumseh Sherman, and Ulysses S. Grant.

Breaking the siege, the Union forces launch a three-pronged attack: a successful capture of Lookout Mountain (“the battle above the clouds”); a vicious fight at Tunnel Hill that ends in a virtual stalemate; and the triumphant attack on and breakthrough at Missionary Ridge.

In his inimitable style, Jeff Shaara combines the historian’s diligent research with the fascinating creativity of the novelist. We learn much more than the dry facts recorded in history books (the who, what, where, when, and why); we are given insights into the various characters’ thoughts and emotions.

Surely the best contemporary novelist writing about the Civil War, Jeff Shaara presents first-person, present-tense accounts of the various strategies and tactics: “I am thinking and feeling thusly,” rather than “He thought and felt thusly.” Such a dynamic methodology infuses his narrative with an engaging immediacy.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of ”Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels ”Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and ”Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

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Editor’s Note:”Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering thoughts from the shadows of a great American city. Dave Carew

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY: “The Pleasure of My Company: A Novel” by Steve Martin

September 4, 2015

Steve Martin 2

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry reviewed books for ”The Tennessean” and ”Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. ”Underground Nashville” is always proud to post Mr. Perry’s latest book review.

If you think Columbo (the TV detective) had an extreme case of OCD, you should get a load of Daniel Pecan Cambridge, protagonist of (the) Steve Martin’s novel, The Pleasure of My Company. If Columbo has a “full house” of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Daniel holds a “royal flush.”

An endearingly edgy neurotic, Daniel has peculiarities and quirks sufficient for a dozen people. He suffers from bouts of anxiety, is haunted with “curb fear” (crossing an eight-inch curb causes a panic attack), is afflicted with agoraphobia, and struggles with paranoia. Daniel speaks of his “demanding sense of order”; he values coherence, symmetry, and serenity. Lonely and searching for love, he lives in a fantasy world, rarely leaving his Santa Monica apartment, except on a perilous, circuitous trek to the Rite Aid Pharmacy for groceries. He buys earplugs simply because they’re on sale, and there’s always the horrible chance he might see a gas station attendant wearing a blue hat.

Our hero is far from being a dummy. One of his favorite pastimes is composing complicated magic squares (mathematical challenges that also fascinated Benjamin Franklin and Albrecht Durer). In no way do Daniel’s psychoneurotic idiosyncracies undermine his intelligence.   Daniel laments a “clerical error” at Mensa: “I’d taken their IQ test, but my score came back missing a digit. Where was that 1 that should have been in front of the 90?”

Other than hilarious descriptions of Daniel’s neuroses, the heart of this tale involves Daniel’s infatuation with three women: Elizabeth Warner, an experienced realtor; Clarissa, a student shrink-in-training who has problems of her own; and Zandy, a cute clerk at the Rite Aid Pharmacy.

Daniel’s wealthy grandmother, who owns a huge pecan grove in Helmut, Texas (hence Daniel’s middle name), mails him generous checks, his only financial support. When Granny dies, Daniel and one of his three love interests travel to Texas to visit the deceased’s grave. To assuage his anxieties over hazarding such a long trip, Daniel determines that every word and sentence he utters en route will be sans the letter “e.”

Discouraged in his quest for mutual affection, Daniel muses, “There are few takers for the quiet heart.” But (and without revealing a spoiler) the novel ends happily. Perhaps there are still takers for the quiet heart!

Daniel’s first-person narrative is both funny and sad; we pull for him that he may have a breakthrough and relate to reality in a more positive, confident fashion.  In The Pleasure of My Company, Steve Martin paints a sympathetic and sensitive portrait of a person struggling to break free of the chains that bind him. Mr. Martin has given us another enjoyable story—a worthy follow-up to Shopgirl.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of ”Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels ”Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and ”Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

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Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note:”Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering thoughts from the shadows of a great American city. Dave Carew

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “The Life of God (as Told by Himself)” by Franco Ferrucci

August 3, 2015

LIFE OF GOD

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY   

The Life of God (as Told by Himself) by Franco Ferrucci is the English adaptation (1996) of Il Mondo Creato (1986). It is a work that causes vastly different reactions.

Fundamentalists describe these memoirs of God as irreverent, iniquitous, idolatrous, sacrilegious, and blasphemous. Liberal readers (including the present reviewer), who perhaps possess a better sense of humor and an appreciation of religious satire, enjoy it as a hilarious comic romp.

In this novel, God is a self-described “heretic and atheistic deity” (non-theistic in the sense that he rejects the orthodox version of himself—a version of a God that humans have created in their own image and whom, astonishingly, they claim to know personally).

Through millennia of evolution, God becomes incarnated in plants, fish, reptiles, mammals, and finally in the “improved” simians known as humans. Neither omnipotent nor omniscient, God fumbles and stumbles his way through life. He muses this confession: “Failure is part of my existence.” Befuddled, confused, and often depressed, Ferrucci’s deity suffers bouts of amnesia and insomnia, and often falls asleep for centuries.

In his restless peregrinations and incarnations on Earth, God meets (among others) Moses, Seneca, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Dante, Columbus, Mussolini, the Buddha, the Pope, and even the Prince of Darkness (although the last-mentioned encounter may have been merely a bad dream).

God is aghast when Moses attributes draconian commandments to his authorship—laws that are contrary to his own benign, benevolent, gentle, and non-judgmental nature. Moreover, God unsuccessfully seeks to convince Dante that humans are ephemeral animals who do not survive death. God tells the poet that his work, The Divine Comedy, contains serious errors and that there is no afterlife—no inferno, purgatorio, or paradiso.

When God surveys his creation, he shudders to see “nature red in tooth and claw”; everywhere his creatures are killing one another. And his (allegedly) highest creation, humans, are the greatest predators of all, perpetrating rape and pillage, incessant wars, and heinous brutalities. He struggles to understand human beings, for their strange behavior shockingly deviates from his well-intentioned plan.

Near novel’s end, God, disappointed and disillusioned over his failed experiment, contemplates packing his bags, abandoning Planet Earth as a lost cause, and skedaddling toward the most distant galaxy. Perhaps on another world his fondest hopes for creation can be fulfilled.

Dogmatists who interpret the Bible literally should avoid this novel like the plague. However, if you’re game for a witty, creative, intelligent, and imaginative work, give The Life of God (as Told by Himself) a try. It’s an iconoclastic masterpiece.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of ”Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels ”Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and ”Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

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Editor’s Note:”Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering thoughts from the shadows of a great American city. Dave Carew

Sabrina Toole working on anticipated debut album

July 30, 2015

Sabrina

by Dave Carew 

Let’s face it: often “the singer-songwriter playing at the local coffee shop” is nothing to write home about. That’s why I was so pleasantly surprised the night I saw Sabrina Toole gigging at Village Vibe. The moment Sabrina began singing I thought to myself, Wow, this is another level. This is going to be cool. And it was. Performing everything from originals to a Radiohead cover (yes, a Radiohead cover in Nashville), Sabrina and her backing musicians delivered a stripped-down yet powerful show that channeled Adele and Joss Stone, while perfectly showcasing Sabrina’s uniquely compelling voice.

We recently learned Sabrina is working on her debut album. We asked her about it, and here’s how our conversation went:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: What is your vision for your upcoming album? How will it differ from your previous work? 

SABRINA TOOLE:  My vision for my debut album is that it will be a fun and energetic sound about all the things I have experienced in my 22 years of living. My hope is that people will be able to listen to this album and relate, and identify with the songs I’ve written. This album is about just living life and enjoying the good with the bad. I’m very excited to share it with my fans. 

UN: To what degree is living and working in Nashville affecting your songwriting and performing?   

ST:  I had major writer’s block for almost 6 months before moving to Nashville. I wasn’t inspired by much of anything, but it was soon after I had moved to Nashville from East Texas that I was flooded with song ideas and melodies. The change of location and scenery definitely helped, but you begin to understand why they call it Music City, and how it came to be so legendary when you actually soak it all in yourself. Nashville will always have a piece of my heart no matter where this life takes me. 

UN:  As an artist, where do you hope to be three years from today? 

ST:  I dream to be playing stadiums for thousands of people in three years, but if I have to think realistically, I hope to be working on a second album and headlining a few tours. Any musician knows that great things take time and I am very excited to see what this year has to bring! 

For more information, please visit:
http://sabrinatoole.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as beautiful, haunting, powerful—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: Underground Nashville covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering thoughts from the shadows of a great American city. Dave Carew

 

 

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “Shopgirl: A Novella” by Steve Martin

July 15, 2015

 Shopgirl

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry reviewed books for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to post Mr. Perry’s latest book review. 

REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY: 

Steve Martin’s Shopgirl: A Novella (2000) is an interesting psychological study of four characters. (CAUTION: The risqué nature of this work may offend some readers. The author peppers its pages with “the f-word”; when released as a film in 2005, it received an R rating.)

Mirabelle goes into a Beverly Hills yogurt shop and hears a woman conversing on a cell phone. Concerned about someone who is ill, the woman says to the person on the other end of the line, “Just remember, darling, it is pain that changes our lives.” (Hold this thought in mind; before story’s end, we shall meet it again.)

The protagonist, Mirabelle Buttersfield, 28—the shopgirl of the title—works in the fourth-floor glove department of a Nieman Marcus store in Los Angeles. Hers is a boring job “selling things that nobody buys anymore.”

Shy and terribly lonely, Mirabelle is attractive, it’s just that she is never the first or second girl chosen. She takes Serzone (and, later, Celexa) to control her immobilizing depression. Separated from suicidal thoughts by only a thin veneer, she struggles to keep that veneer from cracking. Mirabelle desperately needs someone to talk to, to hold her close, to affirm and appreciate her inner beauty.

Lisa Spencer, a flirtatious tart who seduces and captures men simply for the delight of ditching them, also works at Nieman’s, and is Mirabelle’s exact inverse. Steve Martin writes:

“If Immanuel Kant had stumbled across the two women [whom we now see having lunch at the Time Clock Café], he would have quickly discerned that Lisa is all phenomena and no noumena, and that Mirabelle is all noumena and no phenomena.” [In Kant’s philosophy, a phenomenon is a thing as it appears to and is constructed by the mind, as distinguished from a noumenon, or thing-in-itself.] In other words, Lisa is all surface; Mirabelle has depth.

Enter two men with whom Mirabelle develops romantic and erotic involvements: Jeremy, 26, and Ray Porter, a millionaire twice her age. The chronicle of these relationships is an insightful psychological study of how men and women—having divergent expectations—consistently misread and misunderstand one another.

Although the 130-page novella contains some clever quips and humorous moments, it is basically a serious work, rather than the slapstick gag one might expect from Mr. Martin. One pulls for Mirabelle, hoping she will overcome her problems and mistakes, and find the right road out of her slough of despondency.

Although people know Steve Martin as a zany, stand-up comedian—a “wild and crazy guy”—most do not know he majored in philosophy at California State University, studying, among other things, metaphysics, ethics, and logic. At various places in this novella, his penchant for the philosophical peeps through.

In fact, Martin may have picked up a key idea from Nietzsche, who wrote: “Only suffering leads to knowledge. Mighty pain is the last liberator of the spirit; she alone forces us to descend into our ultimate depths. I know life better because I have so often been at the point of losing it.”

Or, as the character in Shopgirl puts it: “Just remember, darling, it is pain that changes our lives.”

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as beautiful, haunting, powerful—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering thoughts from the shadows of a great American city. Dave Carew

Chakra Bleu hits #1; releases new dance single

July 6, 2015

susanna2

By Dave Carew

These are exciting times for beloved pop/rock/Americana artist Chakra Bleu. Her tune “All of Me” just hit #1 on New Music Weekly’s Top 40 Indie Chart, while simultaneously climbing into the Top 10 on the NMW Mainstream Top 40 and Hot 100 Singles Charts.

Released on April 18, the single has been relentlessly edging up the charts, and now has received thousands of radio spins. The hit tune was co-produced by Chakra Bleu and John Billings, a former bass player for the legendary Donna Summer. The accompanying video (check it out on YouTube) was produced by Ray Boone of Music City Video.

If you think “Bleu” is content to do nothing but bask in the glow of a #1, you would be mistaken. She recently released the follow-up to “All of Me,” the dance tune “When We Dance.” A press release from her label described the tune as “a magnetic, pulsing recording that captures the timeless, passionate moment of a couple dancing closely together on the dance floor.”

If you dig that feeling, you’ll likely dig this tune.

For more information, and to download tracks, please visit: http://www.chakrableu.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of Underground Nashville and the author of the novels Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville and Voice from the Gutter, both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as beautiful, haunting, powerful—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: Underground Nashville covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering thoughts from the shadows of a great American city. Dave Carew

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “A Chain of Thunder: A Novel of the Siege of Vicksburg” by Jeff Shaara

July 1, 2015

 Jeff Shaara--Chain

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry reviewed books for “The Tennessean” and Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to post Mr. Perry’s latest book review.  

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY 

Lincoln once said, “The war can never be brought to a close until that key is in our pocket.” The “key” was Vicksburg, Mississippi. Considered by some to be an impregnable fortress, Vicksburg, controlling the flow of traffic on the Mississippi River, was of vital importance to both North and South.

In A Chain of Thunder: A Novel of the Siege of Vicksburg (2013), Jeff Shaara presents a captivating Civil War narrative which, although fictional, is solidly based on historical research. In fascinating detail, he chronicles the nearly-seven-week siege—May 19, 1863 (some authorities say May 22) through July 4—of “The Gibraltar of the West,” and the city’s ultimate surrender to the Union army.

Chapter titles alternate between Ulysses S. Grant; his three Corps commanders (William T. Sherman, James B. McPherson, and John A. McClernand); General John C. Pemberton, C.S.A.; Fritz “Dutchie” Bauer, of the 16th (later the 17th) Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers; and Lucy Spence, 19, an endearing Southern belle who volunteers as a nurse ministering to the sick, wounded, and dying soldiers.

In the Afterword, Shaara writes: “The 1986 edition of the United States Army’s Field Manual on Operations describes Grant’s campaign thus: ‘His operations south of Vicksburg fought in the spring of 1863 has been called the most brilliant campaign ever fought on American soil.’” It was indeed a bold and brilliant campaign.

After several failures to attack Vicksburg from the north, Grant decided to have his troops run the gauntlet past the Vicksburg batteries and cross the river south of the city. He dared cut his army adrift from its base of supplies and “live off the land,” as Sherman did later in his famous (infamous?) march from Atlanta to the sea. Grant first turned east, capturing Jackson, the state capital, and then turned west toward Vicksburg. Met by the Confederate forces under Pemberton, the Union army fought the Battle of Champion Hill (a.k.a. Baker’s Creek) and the Battle of the Big Black River. Then, proceeding farther west, they surrounded Vicksburg with “a chain of thunder,” a nine-mile ring of artillery that bombarded the city with cannon fire.

Starvation caused desperation. After the Rebel troops exhausted their rations, they were reduced to eating their own mules. The citizens of Vicksburg, living in caves dug in the hillside, ate “squirrel stew,” dogs, and rats. After more than six weeks of siege, on July 4, 1863 (the same day the three-day battle of Gettysburg ended in Robert E. Lee’s retreat), Pemberton surrendered the 29,500 men under his command.

Sherman enthused, “The best Fourth of July since 1776!” And Lincoln, rejoicing that the Mississippi River was now entirely under Union control, remarked, “The Father of Waters again goes unvexed to the sea.”

MORE ABOUT JEFF SHAARA:

Jeffrey M. “Jeff” Shaara’s other Civil War novels include Gods and Generals (1996), The Last Full Measure (1998), A Blaze of Glory (2012), The Smoke at Dawn (2014), and The Fateful Lightning (2015). He also is the author of Jeff Shaara’s Civil War Battlefields.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.
http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 

WSM radio personality Kelly Ann Monahan releases mouth-watering new healthy-eating cookbook

June 23, 2015

Kelly Ann Monahan

by Dave Carew

Can losing weight and getting healthy be fun, nutritious, and delicious?

It can be when Kelly Ann Monahan is your guide! Beloved as the WSM radio personality and health correspondent for World Christian Broadcasting, Kelly Ann has just released her first-ever cookbook for those who want to lose weight, gain energy, and achieve optimum health. It’s called Sweet Healthy Living: Delicious, Easy Recipes and is available as an e-book at Sweetie Pie Health or at Amazon.

Why is Sweet Healthy Living a different kind of cookbook? Because its scrumptious recipes—for everything from dinners to salads to smoothies to desserts—will help your body minimize inflammation, a strong contributor to everything from obesity to arthritis to diabetes to heart disease to cancer.

In fact, Kelly Ann herself is living proof of how well Sweet Healthy Living can work. She used these nutritious, easy-to-make, “to die for” recipes to lose 80 pounds, gain an all-new energy and love of life, eliminate a pile of prescription medications, and successfully manage her Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a rare connective-tissue disease that causes terrible pain and fatigue, and which, in Kelly Ann’s case, went undiagnosed for years).

Among the mouth-watering recipes featured in Sweet Healthy Living are Veggie Pot Pie, White Bean Burritos, Healthy Pizza Plate, Simply Delicious Salad Dressing, Berry Blast Breakfast Smoothie, Iced Lite Latte, Foo Foo Frappuccino, and wondrous, healthy deserts such as Pumpkin Pie and Chocolate Chia Cakes.

SPECIAL NOTE: Kelly Ann Monahan will appear again on TV’s Talk of the Town (News Channel 5 in Nashville) on Monday, July 20 at 11 a.m. Kelly also was recently featured in a special article in The Tennessean’s Sunday edition. Google it if you missed it!

To order or for more information, please visit: http://www.sweetiepiehealth.com

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer. ************

Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.” Dave Carew

 


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