Posts Tagged ‘Waylon Jennings’

Book Review: “Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels of the 1970s” by Dennis Glaser

June 10, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

 Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.

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Book Review: “Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels of the 1970s” by Dennis Glaser

By Dave Carew

Dennis Glaser (Tompall’s cousin and former manager) had, in his words, “a front row seat” during the seminal decade of the 1970s when “outlaws” like Waylon Jennings led a transformation of country music sound and culture from ‘hillbilly’ to today’s more modern sound.

Now, Glaser offers YOU that front-row seat in his new book Music City’s Defining Decade, a colorful, insightful, sometimes wickedly funny look at Glaser’s own experiences on Music Row in the ‘70s.  Between the covers of one highly enjoyable and engaging book, Glaser gives us an “up close and personal” look at the stars, songwriters, and scoundrels whose talent, personalities, achievements, and foibles made the 1970s country music’s most transformative and indelible decade.

From Waylon Jennings to John Hartford to Shel Silverstein to the Glaser Brothers to Alabama to dozens of others, Glaser reveals what it was like to know, hang with, and sometimes work for oh-so-human artists and biz wizzes now often viewed as musical icons.

For anyone fascinated by country music history and who desires a street-level, “you are there” perspective on Nashville in the 1970, this book is an absolute must.

Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels is now available from Amazon.com.


David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

 


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