Posts Tagged ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’

Newly launched band “The Burritos” to carry on the musical tradition of Gram Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers

June 3, 2011

By Dave Carew

A new Nashville-based band including local musician Chris James and Walter “Magnet and Steel” Egan, calling itself The Burritos, has been signed by SPV Records in England, and will release its first album in July.  The new record will feature all original songs, written in the musical tradition of the legendary Gram Parsons and The Flying Burrito Brothers.

The Burritos played a set at 3rd & Lindsley in Nashville last week, and will be a featured act on Monday (June 6) at the RiverFest in Wichita, Kansas.

Chris James was kind enough to share some of the band’s back story with Underground Nashville:

“I was contacted by SPV Records in England about a year ago and asked if I might be able to put together a new version of The Flying Burrito Brothers for their label,” James says. “Their requirements were that we cleared each proposed member’s resume with them . . . .  The other determining factor with the record label was that we had to make a real strong album. I agreed that our best defense against those who might claim we have no business calling ourselves The Burritos is to be so darn good at it that it’s hard to knock. If the record wasn’t great, SPV wasn’t going to put it out.

“Fortunately they (and certainly we) feel that we delivered an excellent album.”

The band’s line-up is Chris James (keys & vocals), Walter Egan (guitars & vocals), Rick Lonow (drums & vocals) and Fred James (Chris James’ brother, pedal steel guitar, guitars & vocals).  It is the first time that a band in lineage with The Flying Burrito Brothers actually has real brothers playing in it.

The band is so new its web site is still under construction.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

 

Random thoughts from the underground

January 28, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Middle Tennessee was devastated in May by flooding from which it will take many more months to recover. Please join the recovery effort by contacting Hands on Nashville at Hon.org or by calling (in Nashville) 211. Otherwise, please call 800-318-9355. You can also support The Salvation Army’s relief efforts by going to Salarmy-Nashville.org or calling 800-725-2769.  Thank you.

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Random thoughts from the underground

by Dave Carew

  • Ku-DOS to FYE for actually knowing in which category to place albums by The Flying Burrito Brothers.  The Burritos were a hippie country band—not a rock band—although you’d never know it from any other record store on planet Earth;
  • Every famous venue in Nashville (e.g. The Bluebird Café) is smaller than you think it’s going to be.  Add Jack White’s Third Man Records store to the list . . . although small certainly doesn’t mean “not cool,” in this case;
  • Speaking of which . . . If you haven’t bought a 45 in about 45 years (like me), a decent place to start is with Laura Marling’s “Blues Run the Game,” backed by (Neil Young’s) “The Needle and the Damage Done,” available in the storefront at Third Man Records;
  • The CBFB (cheeseburger on French bread) at Rotier’s soon will be declared the eighth Wonder of the World (asserted the mostly-vegetarian);
  • The next time you go slumming at Waffle House and the waitress tells you they serve breakfast any time, say, “Great. I’ll take scrambled eggs during the French Revolution.” Then send his commission to Steven Wright.


David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

Review of The Flying Burrito Brothers’ “The Gilded Palace of Sin”

February 5, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience. “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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As we head into February, please do not forget those less fortunate than you. To make sure homeless human beings receive the food, love, and friendship they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Review of the Flying Burrito Brothers’ “The Gilded Palace of Sin

By Dave Carew

Here in underground Nashville, we often gravitate toward literature and music that’s a bit off the radar screen. Or, at least, not in vogue. We read novels by Hermann Hesse, Charles Bukowski, and David M. Carew <smirk>, and listen to bands like The Flying Burrito Brothers.

Blessed by a fleeting greatness, the Burritos produced one album that is both universally praised and hardly ever listened to—by anyone. It’s called “The Gilded Palace of Sin” and it’s a f&%king masterpiece. Here’s why:

Unlike any album that preceded it, “The Gilded Palace of Sin” brings late 60s-rock-hippie sensibilities to country music. True to the pioneering musical vision of band founder Gram Parsons, “The Gilded Palace of Sin” offers what I call “hippie country music” or what Gram Parsons—much more famously—referred to as “soul country…Cosmic American Music.”

But it’s not just the sound and the genre that matter here. The songs—particularly the originals from Gram Parsons and Chris Hillman—are absolute gems, pretty much DEFINING moments in hippie country music. Listen to (or YouTube) “Sin City” and you hear country music (not “country/rock” or “progressive country,” thank you) that offers lines seemingly influenced by LSD and the Bible at the same moment:

“On the thirty-first floor, a gold-plaited door,
Won’t keep out the Lord’s burning rain.”

And in the draft-dodging country-ditty “My Uncle,” that particular Uncle (Sam) is lampooned in a chorus that goes:

“So I’m heading for the nearest foreign border,
Vancouver might be just my kind of town,
‘Cause we don’t need the kind of law and order,
That tends to keep a good man underground.”

Later, in the same song, The Burritos sing:

”Now I don’t know how much I owe my Uncle,
But I suspect it’s more than I can pay.”  . . .

In so doing, the Flying Burrito Brothers send out a line that is both political protest and funny as hell at the same time.

I could rant about “The Gilded Palace of Sin” all day long, but I’ll end here, with one additional thought: If you’re interested in what country music can be in the hands of gifted young men who refuse to sell out to Music Row or to anyone else, check out The Flying Burrito Brothers and “The Gilded Palace of Sin.” But be warned: You may not want to listen to much else for the next year or so.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Bernie Leadon’s interesting comment about Gram Parsons

February 1, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience. “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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As we head into the New Year, please do not forget those less fortunate than you. To make sure homeless human beings receive the food, love, and friendship they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.
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Bernie Leadon’s interesting comment about Gram Parsons

By Dave Carew

Two years ago, a friend of mine—a Nashville-based musician—found himself on a plane back home with Bernie Leadon. (For those of you originally from another galaxy, Leadon was a founding member of The Eagles who, prior to that, played in The Flying Burrito Brothers with Gram Parsons and three other original members of that band.)  Because my friend is such a huge Gram Parsons and Burritos fan, he quickly fell into a conversation with Leadon about Gram.

I’m sure the conversation went on for (at least) several minutes, but the one comment made by Leadon that my friend found most interesting, memorable, and thought-provoking was the following. (Leadon was talking about Gram’s place in the history of American music):

“You know, originally they didn’t give Gram enough credit. Now they give him too much.”

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.


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