Posts Tagged ‘David M. Carew’

Louise Mosrie: The “Underground Nashville” interview

November 13, 2012

By Dave Carew

Louise Mosrie is a gifted, award-winning folk / Americana singer-songwriter who was a Rocky Mountain Folk Festival Showcase Artist in 2012. Louise’s album Home was #11 on the Folk DJ “Album of the Year” charts in 2010, and the album and single “Home” hit the #1 position in January of that year.

Last month, I, along with my uncle and his wife, were lucky enough to catch Louise’s wonderful writers’ night at the Bluebird Café. I was so struck by Louise’s performance that I requested an interview. She graciously consented, and here’s how our conversation went:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: Why did you feel compelled to become a singer-songwriter?

LOUISE MOSRIE: I wanted to be a singer from the minute I knew what singing was . . . I mean, from when I was in the crib. I was also a rather introverted type of kid and wrote poetry. Years later, I combined the two things and started writing songs. After I wrote my first song (which really sucked, by the way), I was hooked. It’s been a passion ever since. My goal is to write songs that give you goosebumps or make you cry or both.

UN: If you had the length of an elevator ride to tell Underground Nashville‘s readers what is distinctive about your music—and why they might be enriched by it—what would you say?

LM: My songs are simple, honest, and usually convey a sense of place—very visual and sensory. I write about topics that are atypical and songs that have layers of meaning, very purposefully. Many of my songs are set in a historical context and that seems to attract some listeners who are history buffs. But what other people get from it is their business because it’s different for everyone.

UN:  Where do you hope your music takes you in the next two years, and why?

LM: I would simply like to keep writing and making records and touring. It’s all I’ve ever wanted. If I can make it work in whatever capacity—either as an indie artist or on a label, it makes no difference to me. I just want to keep going. Nowadays it seems like you need lots of outlets to make it all come together . . . TV/film placements, publishing, touring, and downloading/CD/merch sales.

I am working on a new record—hopefully will be doing some fundraising and start production in the next few months. In November, I’m touring in NY with two gigs in New York City, one of which is opening for folk legend Cliff Eberhardt at the historic Gaslight Café, which is exciting for me!

For more information, please visit LouiseMosrie.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at XLibris.com. Dave also is a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

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Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

What’s important about your music?

May 9, 2012

by Dave Carew

Last month I had the honor of leading a workshop for singer-songwriters at the first-ever Liahonaroo festival.  The title of my workshop was “5 Tips for Getting Publicity,” and an important facet of what I taught was how to work most effectively with the media.

One of the crucial things I taught was how vital it is for musicians to be able to talk clearly and intelligently about their music. I asked the singer-songwriters and band members to take some “down time” and truly reflect on these three questions:

*  What is your music all about?

*  What’s unique about it?

*  Why do you believe people should care about it?

Anyone who can answer those three questions—clearly, concisely, intelligently, and without arrogance—will have a decided advantage in cultivating positive relations and communications with the media . . . and, by extension, with current and prospective fans.

Here’s how David Ditrich—a gifted, up-and-coming Christian pop artist who attended my workshop—answered those three questions:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: What is your music all about?

DAVID DITRICH:  I want my music to be a positive message and to be full of hope. Everyone has a story—and a past full of hurt and pain—but no matter what you have gone through, or might be going through, there is hope that your situation can change and things can get better. I want my listeners to be encouraged and reminded that hope is never lost or gone, only forgotten. It’s been here the whole time, so hold onto it and don’t let go!

UN: What’s unique about your music?

DD:  I feel what makes it unique is that, while having a positive message, it still remains kind of edgy. For example, if I start a song off kind of dark, by the end of it I want to resolve it with a message of hope.

UN: Why do you believe people should care about your music?

DD:  A couple of reasons: First, I think people are wanting more than what they are [currently] hearing. There are too many songs in the world that leave people feeling angry, sad, or depressed. And there are far too many songs about things that do not really even matter, like money, sex, and drugs.  I believe my music—even with it being edgy—still can keep my purpose of encouraging and speaking a message of hope, which people can connect with in a real way.

A review of David Ditrich’s (very fine) album’ Hope’ will appear soon in Underground Nashville. In the interim, visit FaceBook.com/DavidDitrichMusic.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org.  Please also consider coming to ParkLife, the benefit concert for Lambscroft, to be held in Sevier Park in 12South on a Saturday in August or September (date TBA soon). Thank you.

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Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

 

Dave Carew

 

 

Cappo’s Christmas Party” benefit for the Nashville Humane Association coming this Saturday to Douglas Corner

November 29, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a Nashvillian” or the Nashville experience. “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.
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“Cappo’s Christmas Party” benefit for the Nashville Humane Association coming this Saturday to Douglas Corner

by Dave Carew

One of Nashville’s most beloved good guys (call him Cappo) is again hosting his popular annual Christmas Party/Benefit Concert to raise money and collect much-needed supplies for the Nashville Humane Association. The benefit, known as “Cappo’s Christmas Party,” will be held this Saturday, December 3, at Douglas Corner Café, starting at 8 p.m.

Admission is free, but Cappo (pronounced COP-oh) always appreciates donations of dog or cat food, animal toys, leashes, beds . . . you get the picture. And money contributions to the Nashville Humane Association always are welcome, too.

If you like good live music—from everyone from Grammy winners to six-year olds getting their first-ever chance to perform before a live audience—this beloved annual benefit is not to be missed. And did I mention your host will keep you in stitches all night?

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

Premier Beatles cover band Fab to present solo Beatles hits at 3rd & Lindsley

November 3, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.

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Premier Beatles cover band Fab to present solo Beatles hits at 3rd & Lindsley

By Dave Carew

This Saturday, Fab—easily one of the best Beatles cover bands in the world—will be presenting SOLO Beatles hits at 3rd & Lindsley…that is, hits John, Paul, George, and Ringo racked up on their own, after the greatest pop/rock band of all-time broke up. The fun starts this Saturday night, November 5, at 7 p.m.

Asked by Underground Nashville who came up with the idea for this new kind of Fab show, the band’s singer/keyboardist Bill Roberts said, “I think it came from a fan, who told it to our bass player, Alison. We’re always looking for new approaches to keep our shows fresh and entertaining.”

So learning a bunch of solo Beatles songs—was it hard?

“Learning new songs is like starting over—they don’t come easy,” Bill replied. “But what is life without variety?”

Hmmmm . . . we wonder if, when Bill said “they don’t come easy” and “what is life,” was he thinking about specific Beatles solo hits?

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

CD Review: The Burritos’ “Sound as Ever”

September 20, 2011

By Dave Carew

Sound as ever” was a valediction Gram Parsons used when closing letters to family and friends. It’s an obscure reference—you basically have to be a Gram freak (like me) to get it, and to, hence, get the connection between Gram Parsons, The Flying Burrito Brothers, and this outstanding debut album by the Nashville-based band The Burritos.

Twenty years from now, when music historians pose the question: “Who, in Nashville during the early 21st century, most kept the musical legacy of Gram Parsons alive?” I will—if still kicking around—answer unequivocally: Chris James and Walter Egan, both of whom now are members of The Burritos. Among the many things each man has done to keep GP’s flame burning has been to play and/or host numerous Gram Parsons Tribute shows. Chris also has written at length about GP in his much-loved music magazine Shake! And Walter frequently has graced his recent shows with the song “Hearts on Fire”—which also appears on this record—which Walter gave to Gram in the early 1970s and which later appeared on Gram’s second solo album, Grievous Angel.

What really counts, though, is how much The Burritos, on this record, delve into the mystic richness of the legacy and use it to create new musical gold. Song after song on Sound as Ever is an absolute gem of the “Cosmic American Music” genre. The unforgettable songs just keep on coming—with “Beggar’s Banquet,” “Angeline,” “The Hundred Year Flood,” and “Song and Dance Man” being particular examples of writing that is—by turns—emotive, country-soulful, and just damn way-cool.

I can offer no higher compliment than this: If Gram Parsons and the original Flying Burrito Brothers could have warded off the demons and produced a great follow-up to their classic The Gilded Palace of Sin, it may very well have sounded like this fantastic new album.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

Libertarian Party Blasts War in Afghanistan

July 1, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.
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Libertarian Party Blasts War in Afghanistan

Exclusive Interview with Wes Benedict, Executive Director, Libertarian National Committee, Inc.

Although it supported the initial U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in the aftermath of September 11, the national Libertarian Party has staunchly opposed most of the ensuing conduct of the war. In this exclusive interview for Underground Nashville—conducted shortly after President Obama’s recent announcement of a forthcoming troop draw-down—LP Executive Director Wes Benedict explains his political party’s firm stance against the present war:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  How do you respond to people who say we must stay in Afghanistan at least through 2014, to keep Al Quaida (via the Taliban) from regaining a foothold that could lead to more attacks against the West?

WES BENEDICT:It was wrong to go there, it is wrong to be there, and we should get out now. Our response to the terrorist attacks has caused far more damage to the West than the terrorist acts themselves. If you’re a Western Christian, I’d say take your finger off the trigger and have some faith in God. If you’re a Western believer in the superiority of freedom, have some faith that authoritarian societal arrangements will self-destruct, like the Soviet Union did. I don’t like Al Quaida, but we can survive with it if we stop doing what they want.

UN: How do you and the LP believe potential terrorist attacks against the U.S. should be countered?

WB: Every human being is a potential terrorist, thief, and murderer. Get over it. People need to get out of their heads that we should be focusing on preventing every possible terrorist attack. Most terrorism against America is a symptom. It is a reaction to our foreign policy of meddling in others’ affairs. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. The 9-11 perpetrators were criminals and we should have only gone after those involved—not entire countries.

For more information about the Libertarian Party, visit LP.org.

Editor’s Note:  The fact that Underground Nashville presents ideas from a certain political figure or organization should not be construed as support of that person or organization. When we write political posts (which happens rarely), we present ideas from across the political spectrum. We believe people should study ideas from a wide variety of sources. It’s what used to be known as “thinking.”

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations copywriter.

Book Review: “Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels of the 1970s” by Dennis Glaser

June 10, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

 Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.

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Book Review: “Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels of the 1970s” by Dennis Glaser

By Dave Carew

Dennis Glaser (Tompall’s cousin and former manager) had, in his words, “a front row seat” during the seminal decade of the 1970s when “outlaws” like Waylon Jennings led a transformation of country music sound and culture from ‘hillbilly’ to today’s more modern sound.

Now, Glaser offers YOU that front-row seat in his new book Music City’s Defining Decade, a colorful, insightful, sometimes wickedly funny look at Glaser’s own experiences on Music Row in the ‘70s.  Between the covers of one highly enjoyable and engaging book, Glaser gives us an “up close and personal” look at the stars, songwriters, and scoundrels whose talent, personalities, achievements, and foibles made the 1970s country music’s most transformative and indelible decade.

From Waylon Jennings to John Hartford to Shel Silverstein to the Glaser Brothers to Alabama to dozens of others, Glaser reveals what it was like to know, hang with, and sometimes work for oh-so-human artists and biz wizzes now often viewed as musical icons.

For anyone fascinated by country music history and who desires a street-level, “you are there” perspective on Nashville in the 1970, this book is an absolute must.

Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels is now available from Amazon.com.


David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

 

The “Underground Nashville” Interview with Singer-Songwriter Darryl MacQuarrie

May 26, 2011

By Dave Carew

Originally from San Jose, California, Darryl MacQuarrie writes and sings the kind of country music that brings to mind the phrase “the real deal.”  In powerful, emotive ballads such as “The Way It Was Supposed to Be” (see YouTube), Darryl renders words and music that course a straight path from his own soul and dreams to those of the listener. Like the very best of country music, Darryl’s work delivers—in a seemingly simple musical presentation—yearnings, feelings, and truths that are profoundly complicated and rich . . . that “get at” not only what it means to be human, but what it means to wrestle with being human.

Underground Nashville recently interviewed this gifted, deservedly-fast-rising artist about his work. Here’s how our conversation went:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  The other day I heard a manager say it’s essential for every artist to have his or her “elevator pitch” . . . your 20-second presentation regarding who you are specifically as a singer-songwriter (i.e., what’s distinctive about you, why people should care about your music).  Okay…we just got on the elevator. What is your elevator pitch?

DARRYL MacQUARRIE: I don’t talk to people in elevators.  No I kid…20 seconds?  OK, here we go.  Let me start by saying that that guy is right.  I think so many people don’t know who they are or where they’re going when they get to a town like Nashville. And if you showed up to a manager’s office and your answer to that question was “I don’t really know” or “I’m sort of like this and/or that,” then it’s going to be hard for that person to take you seriously.

[So] I’d say I’m the best damn voice you’re ever going to hear!  Ha!  I guess I would hope to say, or rather hope to believe, is that I’m unique from anyone else.  Depending on what genre you’re in, and I won’t name names, there’s all this talk about uniqueness, yet once the mold is broken it’s often just a bunch of copycats.  I guess I’m trying to be that mold, a new mold if you will.  I’ve been told I don’t sound like anyone else, which actually I prefer.  Other than that, I would hope you cared about my music because you liked it, and because you felt the connection I feel with it…not because I fit some mold or I get carried around stage in some large egg.  Did I answer your question?  I think my 20 seconds are way up!

UN:  What do you believe is your most important musical accomplishment to date?

DM:  It’s yet to come.  I guess I’m always looking ahead.  Sure, I could name this or that, that I played here or there, or have made an album, but I guess my most important accomplishment is that I’m still doing it and haven’t gone completely nuts yet!  [Laughs] That, and those moments when I write a song that just totally connects with me and those who listen to it.  Those are my best accomplishments, and once I have one I just look forward to the next one.

UN:  If your musical dreams came true over the next five years, what would we see Darryl MacQuarrie doing in 2016?

DM: Sitting in the Bahamas with a cold beer in my hand.  Oh, you meant musically what would I be doing.  I guess the short answer is touring.  But I don’t like short answers.  I guess the main thing is making my living playing music and writing songs.  Just having the ability to play to more and more people andconnect with them, because that’s really what it’s all about. And like I said, I have the best damn voice they’re ever going to hear, so they need to hear it!  I kid.  Or do I???

For more information about Darryl MacQuarrie and to hear his music, visit DarrylMacQuarrie.com. And don’t miss Darryl’s gig at the Bluebird Café on Sunday, July 24.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

 

Interview with Nashville-based singer/songwriter Matthew Solberg

May 17, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

 Dave Carew

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To make sure homeless human beings receive the food, love, and friendship they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting NashvilleRescueMission.org.  Thank you.

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Interview with singer/songwriter Matthew Solberg

By Dave Carew

Matthew Solberg first came to my attention when I learned he had spearheaded the Elliott Smith Tribute Concert presented at The Mercy Lounge in late 2009.  Since then, Matthew has been working on his just-released full-length debut album, Matthew Solberg, which, he says, features songs influenced by Elliott Smith, Daniel Johnston, The Beatles, Paul Simon, Nick Drake, Neutral Milk Hotel, and others.

Interestingly, Matthew—who plays out in Nashville very seldom—has had decent success as an “Internet musician,” promoting his music primarily online.  Underground Nashville asked Matthew about that—and about his new record in general—in this brief interview:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: What was the creative vision behind your new record? What are you trying to achieve with it artistically and musically?

MATTHEW SOLBERG: I think one of my main goals was to make songs that I like. With my first [EP], I sort of just tried to write songs that I thought had good/meaningful lyrics and that showcased some guitar skills—but at the time I was only beginning to get a sense of melody and how to sing. With this new album, I suppose I wanted to take what I did on the EP (focus on lyrics and guitar), and sort of expand on that by adding in some more instrumentation (including more vocal parts) and focusing more on melody.

UN: In the past year, you have mostly been an “Internet musician” and have enjoyed some success spreading your music that way.  Specifically how are you using the Internet to reach music fans and raise your visibility as an artist?

MS: Besides making my first two albums available for free download, I’ve spent quite a bit of time marketing my music online, specifically by contacting bloggers and by advertising. I estimate that my first album got downloaded about 700 times, and it also got radio play in seemingly random countries. That might not sound like much to some, but to me—as an unknown solo artist releasing his first record—it’s reassuring. I couldn’t tell you how many live shows I would have had to have played to get that same effect, but I’m guessing it would be a pretty high number.


For more information about Matthew Solberg and to hear or download Matthew’s music, please visit matthewsolberg.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor/writer of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.

 

Glaser’s New Book Offers Behind-the-Scenes Look at Nashville in the ‘70s

May 3, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

 Dave Carew

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To make sure homeless human beings receive the food, love, and friendship they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting NashvilleRescueMission.org.  Thank you.
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Glaser’s New Book Offers Behind-the-Scenes Look at Nashville in the ‘70s

The 1970s were the decade in which Nashville’s music scene changed forever—transforming from Hillbilly to Music City, fueled by the Outlaw movement. Now—in a fascinating new behind-the-scenes account—Dennis Glaser (Tompall’s cousin and former manager) offers a revealing new look at that seminal era, as it was lived by the people he met during those years. The book is titled Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels.

Among the many fascinating, pivotal figures Glaser knew personally and writes about are Waylon Jennings, Earl Scruggs, Captain Midnight, Shel Silverstein, Tom T. Hall,  Bill Littleton, Johnny Darrell, and Billy Walker.

Glaser’s book offers a you-are-there look at how the artists—sparked by the Outlaw movement—progressed from record label control to development of today’s relationship between art and business. Glaser was present at the birth of the new reality, and gives us a never-before-seen look at that key moment in Music City history.

Music City’s Defining Decade: Stories, Stars, Songwriters & Scoundrels will be available soon from Amazon.com.  Watch for the review of Dennis Glaser’s new book in a future post.


David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and copywriter.


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