Archive for November, 2011

Cappo’s Christmas Party” benefit for the Nashville Humane Association coming this Saturday to Douglas Corner

November 29, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a Nashvillian” or the Nashville experience. “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.
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“Cappo’s Christmas Party” benefit for the Nashville Humane Association coming this Saturday to Douglas Corner

by Dave Carew

One of Nashville’s most beloved good guys (call him Cappo) is again hosting his popular annual Christmas Party/Benefit Concert to raise money and collect much-needed supplies for the Nashville Humane Association. The benefit, known as “Cappo’s Christmas Party,” will be held this Saturday, December 3, at Douglas Corner Café, starting at 8 p.m.

Admission is free, but Cappo (pronounced COP-oh) always appreciates donations of dog or cat food, animal toys, leashes, beds . . . you get the picture. And money contributions to the Nashville Humane Association always are welcome, too.

If you like good live music—from everyone from Grammy winners to six-year olds getting their first-ever chance to perform before a live audience—this beloved annual benefit is not to be missed. And did I mention your host will keep you in stitches all night?

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey” by William Least Heat-Moon

November 8, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

 Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.

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Book Review by Roy E. Perry:
“Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey”
by William Least Heat-Moon


An Engaging Tour of Quaint and Quirky People and Places

The author of this book writes: “Samuel Johnson said it in five words: `Solitude is dangerous to reason.’ I can think of no greater reason for taking to the American road.”

In 1982, William Least Heat-Moon published Blue Highways, a remarkable book whose title refers to old highways (other than Interstates), which were colored blue on maps.

Now, in Roads to Quoz, he ventures again off the beaten path to encounter quirky, but charming, out-of-the-way places and people.

With an easy banter, Heat-Moon engages those whom he meets along the way—colorful characters eager to tell their stories.

Venturing from Florida to New Mexico, Maine, and Idaho, and to other states in between, he writes with the delightful wit and humor reminiscent of Twain, Steinbeck, or Jack Kerouac.

He explains that “quoz” (rhymes with Oz) means anything out of the ordinary: “anything strange, incongruous, or peculiar; at its heart is the unknown, the mysterious.”

Not all of America, perhaps not even the best, can be found along the Interstates or in the big cities. As the poet Robert Frost put it, “I took the road less traveled by–and that has made all the difference.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: William Least Heat-Moon, the pen name of William Trogdon, lives near Columbia, Missouri, on an old tobacco farm he’s returning to forest. His first book, Blue Highways, is a narrative of a 13,000-mile trip around America on back roads. His second work, PrairyErth, is a tour on foot into a small corner of the great tall-grass-prairie in eastern Kansas. River-Horse is an account of his four-month, sea-to-sea voyage across on the United States on its rivers, lakes, and canals. His three books on travels have never been out of print. Heat-Moon is also the author of Columbus in the Americas, a compendium of the explorer’s adventures in the New World.

Roy E. Perry of Nolensville, Tennessee was a book reviewer for the ‘Nashville Banner’ and ‘The Tennessean’ for more than thirty years. Now retired, he also was an advertising copywriter at a Nashville publishing house for more than twenty-five years.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

 

 

Premier Beatles cover band Fab to present solo Beatles hits at 3rd & Lindsley

November 3, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.

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Premier Beatles cover band Fab to present solo Beatles hits at 3rd & Lindsley

By Dave Carew

This Saturday, Fab—easily one of the best Beatles cover bands in the world—will be presenting SOLO Beatles hits at 3rd & Lindsley…that is, hits John, Paul, George, and Ringo racked up on their own, after the greatest pop/rock band of all-time broke up. The fun starts this Saturday night, November 5, at 7 p.m.

Asked by Underground Nashville who came up with the idea for this new kind of Fab show, the band’s singer/keyboardist Bill Roberts said, “I think it came from a fan, who told it to our bass player, Alison. We’re always looking for new approaches to keep our shows fresh and entertaining.”

So learning a bunch of solo Beatles songs—was it hard?

“Learning new songs is like starting over—they don’t come easy,” Bill replied. “But what is life without variety?”

Hmmmm . . . we wonder if, when Bill said “they don’t come easy” and “what is life,” was he thinking about specific Beatles solo hits?

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

The WannaBeatles, Tom Shinness, and other local singer-songwriters to present celebratory evening of Fab Four music

November 1, 2011

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

************

Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscoft.org.  Thank you.

************

The WannaBeatles, Tom Shinness, and other local singer-songwriters to present celebratory evening of Fab Four music

By Dave Carew

This promises to be a pretty sensational week for local fans of Beatles tribute shows. On Thursday night, November 3, the WannaBeatles bring their acclaimed show to Casablanca Coffee in The Gulch, as part of Celebrating The Beatles: An Evening of Music and Stories.  In addition to the acclaimed Beatles tribute band, the evening will feature local stand-out Tom Shinness, one of the city’s premier instrumentalists /singer-songwriters.

In the liner notes to his album Escape, Tom Shinness describes his music as “a unique sonic journey.”  As one who caught two of Tom’s performances at Bicyclette over the past year, I can vouch for the aptness for that self-description.

One thing that sets Tom apart as a musician is his gift for playing instruments in highly distinctive ways.  For the Beatles show on Thursday night, Tom will be performing his rendition of George Harrison’s “Something” … but in a very unusual way. He will sing the song as he plays the cello—like a guitar!

Asked how he was first turned on to the music of the Beatles, Tom responded: “I became a huge fan about the time The White Album came out in 1968. My older brother got the album for Christmas, and I was so intrigued that it had a plain white cover and cost twice as much (double album) as a normal album. I saw rows and rows of plain white sitting in the record bins at J.C. Penny. I instinctively knew that the music inside had to be really good if so many people were going crazy over a plain white cover. To this day, it is my favorite album of all time. I think I could probably play every song from it.”

For more information about this event, visit CasablancaCoffee.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance book editor, publicist, and advertising/marketing/public relations writer.

 


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