Archive for April, 2010

The U.S. political party that could rule for 20 years

April 29, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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The political party that could rule for 20 years

By Dave Carew

In 2006 and 2008 a majority of the American public—sick to death and horrified by the immoral, strategically-idiotic war in Iraq and (in 2008) a collapsing economy—voted the Republicans out of power, the Democrats in.

Now—with the majority equally livid about sky-high unemployment, Wall Street bail-outs, and unprecedented government intrusion in the economy—it appears the Republicans will soon make a huge come-back, as the Democrats get a beat-down.

When will this moronic, toggle-switch dynamic end? Answer: ONLY when one of the political parties (or a new political movement) analyze which recent GOP and Democratic principles and performance factors the majority embraced, and which they rejected.

Implicit in the GOP failures of 2006 and 2008 is an American majority that embraces a strong defense against terrorism and true foreign enemies . . . but which equally and passionately rejects the use of U.S. military power in nation-building blood-baths that have nothing to do with our security. On the other hand, the struggles of the Democratic Party—for most of the years since the election of Reagan in 1980—reveal a nation sick to death of high taxes, deficits, and debt.

A U.S. political party that would aggressively embrace a strong national defense AND a rejection of military intervention EXCEPT when absolutely necessary to our defense . . . coupled with low taxes and genuine fiscal responsibility . . . could achieve political hegemony for decades to come.


David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Rachel Gladstone riffs on dudes, relationships, marriage, divorce, and more

April 23, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Rachel Gladstone riffs on dudes, relationships, marriage, and divorce

By Dave Carew

Rachel Gladstone—one of Nashville’s most talented humor writers, bloggers, and novelists—has spent the past year building a national following for her “The Petty Chronicles” blog on FirstWivesWorld.com.  Because Rachel now has a devoted national following—eager for her insightful take on men, relationships, marriage, and divorce—Underground Nashville sought her out for an exclusive interview. Here’s how it went:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE:  What three characteristics do you think MOST women find MOST attractive in a man?

RACHEL GLADSTONE: There’s a funny movie called P.S. I Love You where one of the female characters is looking for love and she asks the same three questions of every man she meets:

1. Are you single?

2. Are you straight?

3. Are you working?

These are important questions, and ones I think all women wish we could ask the first time we meet a man we’re attracted to. The bottom line for me is whether or not the guy can make me laugh, can afford to take me out to for a meal that is at least a few notches above Waffle House, and can string more than two sentences together at a time. Intelligence is a huge turn-on for most women, but the bottom line is: Is he a good kisser?


UN: What is the most important thing a man can do to REMAIN attractive to the woman he is with?

RG: Always remain attentive to her needs. Make her feel special. Compliment her and for God’s sake, help with the housework once in a while! Also, men tend to get controlling once they’re in a relationship and nobody likes to be bossed around. And don’t forget how important it is to talk, talk, talk about everything!

UN: Statistics show a majority of divorces in the U.S. are initiated by the woman. Why do you think that is true?

RG: I think men become complacent once they’re done with the pursuit of a woman, and feel they have her where they want her. But people grow; they evolve over time. Most women remain interested in life and they want to try new things, meet new people, explore new interests. Quite often I think their husbands want to stick with the routines they’ve gotten used to, and therein lies the rub. If he’s lying around watching sports all weekend, and doing a bit of yard work, this will inevitably be the beginning of a big yawn-fest for her. Also, once again, I think men tend to become controlling about things like money and her independence and this can become a very slippery slope. Once you head down it, it’s hard to turn back. Also, most women are far more open to this thing we call “communication.” Men are often reticent to open up about their feelings—or may not even know how to name the blasted things—but it’s paramount that they don’t discount the importance of talking to their wives.


David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

The James Taylor / Carole King rip-off

April 16, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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The James Taylor / Carole King Rip-off

By Dave Carew

I used to know a guy here in Nashville whose mantra was: “Think things can’t get any worse? Just wait.”  I really valued the guy’s sunny disposition and positively uplifting attitude towards life.

I thought of that guy this morning, when I read about the upcoming (May 22) James Taylor / Carole King concert at Bridgestone Arena.  A short time ago, I had blogged about the outrageous prices ($92 and $127) the once-great and now long-washed-up Neil Young is charging for his upcoming Ryman gig.  Well, are you ready for this?  Compared to James and Carole, Neil is positively slumming.  Best-seat tickets for Taylor / King—neither of whom has released a great album in more than thirty-five years—are $386 . . . with even nose-bleed seats at $80.

Don’t get me wrong: I understand and value the free market, and want to see talented artists (even those now shadows of their former selves) rewarded for the enrichment and pleasure they bring their audience. But freakin’ $386 for a good seat?  There’s a point where the free market ends . . . and exploitation and contempt for the audience begin.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Help make a dream come true for Special Olympics athletes

April 15, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Help make a dream come true for Special Olympics athletes

By Dave Carew

Last night I received a fundraising letter from Alan Bolick, Executive Director of Special Olympics Tennessee, announcing the 2010 Summer Games to be held May 21-22 at Vanderbilt University.  To cover the expenses of the event, the organization is hoping to raise $81,500.

If you’ve ever known mentally-challenged people, you know they can be some of the sweetest, gentlest people God ever created. Each year, thousands of them build confidence, self-esteem, and a sense of fair-play through their participation in Special Olympics.

To support this wonderful cause—and the upcoming Summer Games at Vanderbilt at which 1,000 special athletes are expected to participate—please send your tax-deductible contribution of $25, or whatever you can afford, payable to  Special Olympics  / PO BOX 292549  / Nashville, Tennessee 37229.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

The old man’s baseball memories

April 7, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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The old man’s baseball memories

By Dave Carew

One of the reasons I set my novel Everything Means Nothing to Me in underground Nashville was to give voice to people whose stories otherwise would not be told. I was principally interested in giving artistic voice to Nashville’s dispossessed—to the misfits, the alienated, the addicted, the profoundly lonely. But I also was interested in shedding light on “average people” in our great city…because these people, too, have incredible stories.

I heard one of those stories the other day when I was—of all things—grocery shopping at Kroger. I was wearing a Red Sox T-shirt, and an old man (one of Kroger’s employees) struck up a conversation with me.

“You like baseball, huh? A Red Sox fan?”

“Yes, sir. I’m originally from New England and have been rooting for the Sox my whole life.”

“I love baseball, too,” the old man said. “Was quite good in it in my time. Got signed by the Yankees, right out of high school, here in Nashville. I threw left-handed. Had this mean curve ball. Man, I thought I was gonna be pitching in Yankee Stadium.”

“You never did?”

“Nope. Buddy of mine and I were out one night, with a couple of nice girls—double-date—and he fell asleep at the wheel, driving us home. We were all hurt real bad. Real bad. My left arm was broken in two places and never was the same. I tried learning to throw right-handed—even pitched some minor league games that way—but by that time my time had passed.”

The old man and I chatted for another few minutes. Then he said, “Well, better let you go so you can get your groceries.” With that, he smiled cordially and ambled away, down the potato chip aisle.

I stood watching him for a moment, grateful for his story, grateful that he’d shared it with me, wondering what other stories lay in the hearts and minds of the nameless, numberless shoppers around me.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

“The Tennessean” gets it exactly right … with one huge omission

April 5, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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”The Tennessean” gets it exactly right . . . with one huge omission

By Dave Carew

As Juno would  say, “ku-DOS” to The Tennessean for its continued investigative reporting on how the “MYSTERY SHOPPERS WANTED!” scam has bilked Tennesseans—particularly the unemployed, elderly, and others especially vulnerable—out of thousands of dollars.

Unfortunately, what the paper has never acknowledged, in the two articles I’ve seen on this topic to date, is that they themselves ran “MYSTERY SHOPPERS WANTED” ads for MONTHS, until yours truly told them they . . . um . . . might not want to run those classified ads in the exact same edition of the paper in which they were exposing the ads as a scam.

To The Tennessean’s credit, it immediately yanked the ads (which, again, had been running for MONTHS in the paper) once I sent an e-mail about it to the reporter who wrote the first exposé and to Tennessean editor Mark Silverman.  But sheesh.  Talk about editorial not knowing-eth what advertising doeth.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.




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