Archive for March, 2010

Rachel Gladstone’s “The Petty Chronicles” now posted on YouTube

March 29, 2010

Rachel Gladstone’s “The Petty Chronicles” now available on YouTube

By Dave Carew

I’m happy to report that video highlights from Rachel Gladstone’s play “The Petty Chronicles: A New Comedy about the Funny Side of Divorce” now are available on YouTube. (Simply type “Petty Chronicles” into the “search” function on YouTube, and most scenes from the play will pop up, presented in easy-to-view segments of just-a few-minutes each.)

If you missed this hilarious-and-poignant play’s five-day debut run at Bongo Java After Hours Theatre in February, this is your chance to see the work exactly as it was presented at that time.

“I’m so pleased my friend Arthur Kirkby filmed the play, and now has posted it for everyone in the world to see on Youtube,” Rachel Gladstone told Underground Nashville. “Many, many people have honored me by telling me the play could successfully be taken to the next level—by being performed in major markets such as Chicago, Atlanta, New York, or again in Nashville—so I’m hoping that, via YouTube, a prospective director or producer will see the work’s value and be interested in presenting it later in the year.”

Rachel says there also will be an announcement about the posting of the play’s scenes on YouTube at Firstwivesworld.com, where her “Petty Chronicles” blog enjoys the enthusiastic weekly following of 25,000 readers worldwide.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Neil Young pi#ses on Nashville

March 25, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Neil Young pi#ses on Nashville

By Dave Carew

What is it with these washed-up rock stars?  Do they NEVER feel they’ve hosed the public enough? Do they NEVER feel they made enough coin?

Latest Exhibit A: The Tennessean is reporting Neil Young will be performing at the Ryman Auditorium solo on June 1. Great news, right? I would have thought so, since I own more Neil Young CDs, DVD’s, and books that you can shake a stick at. Then I looked at the price tag of this (presumably) nothing-but-guitar-and-vocal event. You ready for this? Cheapest seat: $92. Decent seat: $127.

Politicians, Wall Street, and other crooks put The Average Guy’s economy in the toilet…people who work hard and play by the rules are hurting everywhere…and this is how Neil Young responds. I hope on June 1 Neil’s looking over the footlights at rows and rows of empty pews. I know it will never happen. But it would be just.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Interview with Elliott Smith Tribute Concert producer Matthew Solberg

March 23, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Interview with Elliott Smith Tribute Concert producer Matthew Solberg

By Dave Carew

Matthew Solberg is a young Nashville-based singer/songwriter whose seven-song I Am a Fool EP has received air play in the U.S., the UK, and other countries around the world. Now working on his first-length album, Matthew counts Elliott Smith as one of the major sources of his artistic inspiration. On October 18, 2009, Matthew produced the successful Elliott Smith Tribute concert at Mercy Lounge in Nashville, whose proceeds benefited the Elliott Smith Memorial Fund for abused children.

Underground Nashville recently caught up with Matthew for this interview:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: Why did you first decide to put together the Elliott Smith Tribute Concert at the Mercy Lounge?  What were you hoping to experience or accomplish?

MATTHEW SOLBERG: I thought it’d be fun to take part in an Elliott tribute show, but for a few years I was waiting around for one to happen in whatever town I happened to be living in at the time. So after realizing that waiting for someone else to put one together might have me waiting forever, I figured that I’d just put one together myself. Really, I wasn’t trying to experience or accomplish anything profound. I just wanted to put together a show that would be a fun way for musicians to pay tribute to Elliott while also entertaining fans by giving them a chance to hear Elliott’s songs performed live.

UN: If you had only the length of an elevator ride to tell someone why Elliott Smith was such an important singer/songwriter, what would you say?

MS: That’s a tough question (and it totally depends on who the other person is). I’d probably introduce Elliott by saying he created some great melodies, he was a skilled and creative guitarist, and he wrote lyrics that have just the right amount of complexity to be both complex and accessible. It’s a rare treat to come across someone who has all of those qualities. Really, I think I would just stress that the person should listen for him/her self… you can talk all day about how someone is a great artist, but I don’t think someone will really understand until they experience the art firsthand.

UN: What do you believe is Elliott’s musical and personal legacy?

MS: I think his musical legacy is that, not only are a lot of artists influenced by Elliott, but a lot of people also seem to really connect with Elliott’s lyrics. Besides that Elliott had some great guitar and melody-making skills, his lyrics seem to have a significant impact on a lot of his listeners. As far as a personal legacy… unfortunately, we as a society like to take people’s lives and sum them up as simply as possible, and I think his legacy among people who aren’t hardcore fans tends to be that he was a quiet but very talented singer/songwriter who battled depression and drugs and allegedly committed suicide. I really enjoyed Autumn de Wilde’s book on Elliott, as I think it kinda portrays what Elliott was like on a day-to-day basis… I’d hope that something like that grows to define his personal legacy.

UN: I understand you’re planning another Elliott Smith Tribute Concert for late 2010. Do you have any preliminary details at this point?

MS: Unfortunately, I don’t have any details right now, except that it will probably be in October again. I will say that if anyone who came to the show last year has any ideas for improvement, they should let me know at contact [at]matthewsolberg.com. Last year’s turnout was pretty good and I thought the songs were well-performed, but I’m always open to changes. One change I’m thinking about is that last year the artists all played both Elliott’s songs and their original songs, but I’m not sure if I want to do the original songs this year.

UN: How might people get additional information about you and/or your late 2010 Elliott Smith Tribute Concert?

MS: My website is matthewsolberg.com. I haven’t updated my website recently since I’m focused on my next album and don’t have much news to report right now, but normally I keep it pretty up-to-date. Also, last year I was fortunate to have Elliott’s official Facebook page make a post about my show, so hopefully that’ll happen this year too, to help get the word out.

For more information about the concert or Elliott Smith, please visit Matthewsolberg.com or sweetadeline.net.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Film Review by Vince Gaetano – - “The Last Picture Show”

March 20, 2010

THE LAST PICTURE SHOW

Directed by Peter Bogdanovich

Released: 1971

A review by Vince Gaetano

Boredom is a powerful motivator. People do stupid things when they’re bored. Emergency rooms across America are filled with the horrific, sometimes humorous (other times both) results of children with nothing better to do. Eventually, everyone gets bored; and eventually, boredom passes.

But what if it didn’t? What if you were stuck in a rut of perpetual tedium, and knew full well that it was never going to end?

That’s the nightmare faced by nearly every character in “The Last Picture Show.”

The story is simple enough: so simple, in fact, one can argue that there isn’t a story. “The Last Picture Show” plays more like a series of vignettes, all connected by the town of Archer City, Texas and its residents.  Throughout the film, friendships will be made, broken, and rekindled, affairs will be had by the young and the old, deaths will occur, and all of it will be gossiped by the various busybodies that seem to crawl from the woodwork for every juicy detail. Though they all act immoral, it is not an accepted level of immorality that drives their actions. It’s boredom, plain and simple. None of them have anything better to do with their lives, and they know they never will. It’s a very freeing realization. It keeps them from ever having to worry about the inevitable consequences of their actions. These people are not immoral by sheer virtue of the fact that they have no idea what morality is. There is no “right” or “wrong”. There is only “boredom” and “anything else”; and in Archer City, Texas, “anything else” is always the better choice.

Take, for instance, Jacy Farrow (Cybil Shepherd), whose only real skill in life is manipulation. It’s not so surprising. She has the looks, the charm, and the flashy eyes to get anything she wants. But her father is, without question, the wealthiest man in town — she already has everything she wants. It’s quite a dilemma. So she decides to manipulate without purpose, getting people to bend to her will because it’s the only thing she knows how to do. It’s pathetic, even to her.

Her boyfriend, Duane (Jeff Bridges), is similarly afflicted. Unfortunately for him, the only thing he knows is Jacy. You can see how this might be a problem. He, on the other hand, does not.

The only person in the community with any resemblance of a conscience is Sonny (Timothy Bottoms). Unfortunately, he’s just as bored as everyone else, and so he tries his hand at an affair with an older, married woman. It’s a temporary fix, and a bad one at that. He’s much too nice a person to not let the infidelity get to him, and it does. It hits him hard, in a way he never saw coming.

The film opens with a title card: “The Last Picture Show.” Unlike most movies, this is not a reminder to the audience, lest anyone forgets what they’re watching two minutes after sitting down. Instead, the title serves as a declaration: “This is what you’re about to see.” I felt like a second title card should have been inserted directly after, one that read: “Deal with it.”

Because the movie never veers away from itself, never gets lost in a message or moral. This is a movie without a moral. This is a slice of life, whether it be the writer’s, the director’s, the actors’, or, more likely, a combination thereof. It’s very true to itself.

By the movie’s end, I was very uncomfortable. What I saw was too real and much too ambiguous. I felt like a peeping tom. Few movies can do that to a person. “The Last Picture Show” does it well. Maybe too well.

Does that make it a good movie? I can’t say. Much like life, it all depends on what you’ve taken away from it.

I can say this though: Watching it is an experience. One I think that’s worth having.

Vincent Gaetano is an aspiring screenwriter and director who graduated with honors from SUNY Oneonta with a major in video production. He currently resides in Rochester, NY.

Interview with roots-rock singer/songwriter Pat Anderson

March 11, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Interview with roots-rock singer/songwriter
Pat Anderson

By Dave Carew

Pat Anderson is an indie roots-rock singer/songwriter based in Nashville. Over the past few months, Pat has showcased his music at the world-famous Bluebird Café and at other Nashville venues, and currently is working on his debut album, due this spring. Although Pat’s prime focus these days is working on his album and building his local fan base, he’s already capturing attention beyond Nashville’s city limits. Roots Revival Radio in Belgium hailed Pat “a very talented young artist who deserves highlight attention.”  And GreenManReview.com said of Pat: “This is a singer who is going to be BIG . . . . You will be hearing a lot more of Pat Anderson.”

Underground Nashville recently caught up with Pat for this interview:

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: How would you describe your music? How is it distinct from the commercial (primarily country) sound people associate with Nashville?

PAT ANDERSON: I guess I’d say it is singer/songwriter roots rock.  It probably fits under the Americana label pretty well [too].  I’m pretty sure that right now I’m not writing or producing music bound for the commercial country market.  For one, my budget’s not big enough!  For another, I think my stuff is a little dark for today’s commercial country radio.  It’s not necessarily typical Monday morning on-your-way-to-work “drive time” music meant to keep folks tuned in through the commercials. What attracts me to other artists’ songs is when I feel a real vital human element in the story and performance, and I think, for all of its strengths musically and production-wise, I miss this in a lot of commercial “Nashville” stuff—not all, but a lot of it.  The soul behind the music and songwriting is often buried under a pop marketing sheen that obscures it for me.  That’s definitely not to say that there aren’t bright spots, because the cream of that crop is just as good as anything put out by anyone, period.

UN: What topics particularly interest you as a lyricist?  Why?

PA: I was born in Oklahoma and raised there, and in Virginia close by the Blue Ridge Mountains, and my family all come from Mississippi and Louisiana originally. So it comes naturally to have a rural/smaller town setting for most of my songs. Topically, I think I just try and key in on something vital that I can hook into emotionally.  [On my forthcoming record] there are songs about love, hard work, murder, drug abuse, hope, the pursuit of happiness, loneliness, etc.  The songwriters I most admire tend to be able to capture a pretty wide swath of what it means to be human, both good and bad.  I try, with widely varying degrees of success, to live up to that.

UN: How are you attempting to capture the interest of fans and/or the industry with your music? Are you playing out a lot?

PA: Right now I’m just trying to make the best record I can and then kind of take stock and see what I can do with it to get it out there.  I haven’t been playing out a bunch lately, but hope to change that once the record is done and I have something to offer folks.

UN: What is your ultimate “dream” for your music?  How do you hope to touch people’s lives with it?

PA: I guess I have a two-pronged dream.  One is that I just want to make good enough music that it affects people in the same way that the music I like affects me. There’s something comforting and strengthening in the best music, and it makes the world a little bit more habitable place to me.  The other is that I get to a point where enough folks support what I’m doing so that I can really do it full-time and continue to make records.

UN: Finally…Is there anything else you’d like to tell people about your music?

I guess just how excited I am about this new record.  I was really lucky to get some incredible musicians together and they did what incredible musicians do—played some great music.  Tim Marks (bass), Nick Buda (drums, percussion), Rob McNelley (electric guitar), Jen Gunderman (piano/organ/electric piano/harmonium/accordion), and Will Kimbrough (electric guitar/mandolin/resonator guitar/banjo/bouzouki) all did a wonderful job.  Chad Carlson and Gordon Hammond did a great engineering job in capturing the tracks.

For more information about Pat Anderson and/or to sign up for Pat’s e-mail list, please visit Patandersonmusic.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Interview with fast-rising pop/rock singer-songwriter Johnna Day

March 8, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Interview with fast-rising pop/rock singer/songwriter Johnna Day

by Dave Carew

On February 24, I kindly and graciously gave myself a great birthday present: I attended the MTSU Showcase at the Bluebird Café. I had been invited by my friend Ryan Hayden, an MTSU student and singer/songwriter, who had been asked to perform original songs “in-the-round” that night at the world-famous club. Performing with Ryan was fellow MTSU student and singer/songwriter Johnna Day. Ryan and Johnna were selected by MTSU to appear at the Bluebird after each had submitted songs deemed of particularly outstanding quality.

Over the years, I’ve attended scores of writers-in-the-round events, but none as memorable as this one. Listening to Johnna and Ryan, I was reminded of the famous Dave Marsh quote from the ‘70s, which went something like: “I’ve seen the future of rock & roll, and its name is Bruce Springsteen.” While Johnna or Ryan may never flat-out revolutionize pop/rock or country music, I have absolutely no doubt each will make a significant mark. They’re simply too talented and driven for it not to come to that.

After the showcase, Underground Nashville requested interviews from both Johnna Day and Ryan Hayden. The interview with Johnna immediately follows; the one with Ryan will appear soon.


UNDERGROUND
NASHVILLE: How would you describe your music? Which artists have been your primary influences?

JOHNNA DAY: My music is very versatile. It tends to touch country-pop sometimes, but mainly stays in the area of rock and pop. Lately, rock has been my main source of songwriting. Jewel is an artist I have always admired. She has been an inspiration for me to write, ever since I was a little girl. Her lyrics capture your imagination, and the musicality and gentle angelic timbre of her voice is enrapturing. Muse is a band I’ve recently been influenced by, because of their hint of 80s-rock-style. Matthew Bellamy has such great talent and style. It really is amazing, especially if you see him in concert!

UN: What is your musical vision?

JD: My musical vision is very ambitious. I come from a small town in Owensboro, Kentucky. I worked at a grocery store there for four years in high school, and as I neared my graduation many people asked me what my plans were for college. When I would respond that I was going to Nashville to become a Songwriting major, I wasn’t taken too seriously. Yeah, this might have hurt my feelings, but more than anything, it lifted my spirits and made me encourage myself to prove them all wrong.

UN: If your musical dreams were to unfold perfectly over the next five to ten years, what would happen?

JD: I would be ecstatic. My plans are to create as many albums as possible, with various styles of music on them. I don’t like to stick to a particular “sound” or “genre.” If your music sounds good as a rocker AND an acoustic-style singer, then go for it. I have a background in composing classically. I hope to write more of a variety of music as I grow in my career and learn from the pros surrounding me.

UN: What is your ultimate “dream” for your music? How do you hope it will affect people?

JD: I would like people to know that my music has an overall uplifting message to convey to everyone. In one of my songs I recently wrote here at school, I talk about how I need “something to hold” because everything seems to be slipping away or is already too far away to grasp. With my music and this song in particular, I just want people to realize they aren’t the only ones who feel alone. We can connect with each other during the low times of our lives as well as the high. Just last night, I was reminded by my friend Raymond of The Beatles’ motto that it’s important to “get by with a little help from our friends.”

Johnna Day will release her debut EP Breakfree on April 13, 2010. For more information and to hear Johnna’s music, visit Myspace.com/JohnnaDay.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Album Review – - “You’re the One” by Chakra Bleu

March 4, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

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More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Album Review by Dave Carew:

“You’re the One” by Chakra Bleu
Produced by Chakra Bleu and David Henry

Ten-Eighty Records

Chakra Bleu.com

Anyone who has ever seen a Chakra Bleu live show knows how it affects you: The vibe of joy, peace, inspiration, and empowerment hangs palpably in the air … and you leave the club somehow feeling better about your world, knowing there is music like this, thoughtfulness and creativity like this.

Much of that vibe is attributable to Chakra Bleu herself, easily one of the kindest, most caring and gracious artists ever to grace a Nashville stage. Luckily for her many fans, “Ms. Bleu” has a gift that extends beyond her own personality, beyond her unique live shows. It also radiates into the albums she has created over the years, beginning with 2000’s superb The Hidden Mirror and culminating, most recently, with You’re the One (released December 2009).

Fans who think they know what a Chakra Bleu album is “all about” may—like this reviewer—be a bit surprised by this album…though certainly not in a bad way. Where previous CB albums concentrated on nurturing both the mind and heart, this work—quite intentionally—tips the scales dramatically toward the heart, with all the joy and hope one’s romantic love for another human being can bring you and that other person. The songs here are lyrically simpler than previous CB efforts—but simple only in the sense that “I love you,” at first blush, may seem like simple words.

Starting with the jaunty, reggae-influenced “More Than Fine” (which your ears will be treated to as soon as you cruise over to Chakrableu.com), the album proceeds to waft its way through a sonic landscape of everything from pop to Americana to “prog rock,” all spinning around the spiritual axis of what “the one”—your heart’s desire, your soul mate—means to you, how he or she affects your life in the moment and in all the moments to follow. A particular stand-out track is “Sunflower of My Dreams,” which Chakra Bleu, in a recent interview with Underground Nashville, called “the under-current of this album, in that the sunflower itself, and its symbolism, became the theme [of the album]. The symbol of the sunflower includes that of hope, success, fulfillment, prosperity, health, devotion, peace, and happiness.”

I could go on and on about how Chakra Bleu’s You’re the One will, in its entirety, help bring YOU those very qualities, but I’d rather step out of the way now, and simply tell you this:  If love is important to you—if you think it’s what matters most—you’ll hear that affirmation profoundly in this first-rate new collection of songs.

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.

Part II– Interview with Nashville-based pop/rock artist Chakra Bleu

March 1, 2010

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective. As I told ‘The Tennessean’ in 2008, “since moving to Nashville twenty-five years ago, I have met people whose lives do not remotely reflect the caricature of what many outside our city presume to be a ‘Nashvillian’ or the Nashville experience.” “Underground Nashville” thus explores the soul of the city, not its surface—offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

************

More than 4,000 men, women, and children now are homeless in Nashville—a significant increase since The Great Recession began. To make sure these human beings have the food, shelter, and love they need, please donate to the Nashville Rescue Mission by calling (615) 255-2475 or by visiting Nashvillerescuemission.org.  Thank you.

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Part II – - Interview with Nashville-based pop/rock artist Chakra Bleu
by Dave Carew

Chakra Bleu is—hands down—one of the most original and distinctive pop/rock artists ever to grace the underground Nashville music scene. Inspired by everything from transcendent New Age thought to the soulful stylings of bands like Heart and the Cowboy Junkies (with whom her co-producer David Henry worked), she has forged, over the past decade, some of the most uplifting, eclectic, thought-provoking, and empowering pop ever created in Music City. “Underground Nashville” recently interviewed Chakra Bleu about her career and new album “You’re the One.” Part II of our interview immediately follows. (Please see February posts for Part I.)

UNDERGROUND NASHVILLE: What is your “dream” for you music? How do you hope people are affected by it?

CHAKRA BLEU: It is always my highest intention that the fans receive a ‘positive-vibe’ from the CD’s and/or live shows. As an entertainer and singer/songwriter, it is important to relate to my audiences. We all work hard. We all want to feel good. We all aspire to feel more joy and completion and acceptance in our lives through our relationships, jobs, health, and connection to the Divine/Universe/Life.

Sometimes, we get a glimpse of the meaning of things, when something of relevance is said a little differently…without judgment…meeting our experience “where we are” on the path of life. My highest intention is to inspire the listener to greater heights of joy, understanding, love, health, and overall happiness through my music…whether it’s my love songs or the more introspective songs. Nothing in my songs is a new concept. It’s just written and conveyed a little differently. Yes, I truly aspire to providing an avenue for my audiences, to feel good about themselves and their lives…my songs, voice, and heart offering a journey to a little more joy in this unpredictable life… inspiring them through my pop/rock & Americana songs…inspiring them through my love songs and empower-insight songs.

For more about Chakra Beu, and to listen to her music, visit chakrableu.com

Coming soon in “Underground Nashville” . . . a review of Chakra Bleu’s new album “You’re the One.”

David M. (Dave) Carew is editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter.” He also is a freelance publicist and copywriter.


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