Artlightenment 2014 Art and Film Festival coming November 13-15

November 6, 2014

Arty

Artlightenment, the annual multi-media art show and film festival that showcases dozens of visual artists, painters, sculptors, and filmmakers, is slated to run November 13, 14, and 15 at The Celebrity Centre (Old Fall School Building), 1130 8th Ave. S., Nashville, TN, 37203.

Created by painter, sculptor, and film producer, Robyn Morshead in 2009, this three- day event also features workshops, live music, and a fashion show, making it a vital force in Nashville’s creative community.

The theme of this year’s Artlightenment is “The Light Side of Art,” and will feature the work of underwater photographer and filmmaker Christy Rogers, a visionary artist who uses the refraction of light on her subjects to create beautiful images reminiscent of the paintings of Rubens and Caravaggio.

Ms. Rogers’ work, which is being shown internationally, is currently on display at the Angers Nantes Opera House in Angers, France, and this will be the only opportunity to see her large-format prints in Nashville. Join her as she hosts a special pre-show seminar, “My Career in Underwater Photography and Film” on Thursday, November 13 at 5:30 pm.

This year’s festival also will highlight the work of landmark photographer Raeanne Rubenstein, whose work has graced the pages of publications such as People magazine and The New York Times. Attendees can hear Rubenstein speak on “The Funny Side of Art and Film” on Thursday, November 14 at 7:00 pm.

Actress Carla Christina Contreras will be kicking off Artlightenment’s Film Festival on Saturday, November 13 at 6:30 pm with her talk “A Long and Successful Acting Career.” Carla’s recent film work includes Two Eggs (with Tom Skirret), Self Offense (official selection in eight film festivals), Static (eleven awards, including Best Actress), as well as the feature film Summer Snow. Some of her other work includes Army Wives, America’s Most Wanted, and a co-starring role in Following Her Heart, which starred Ann-Margret, George Segal, and Brenda Vacarro.

The festival is proud to feature The MTSU Paris Project, three films produced by well-known documentary filmmaker Tom Neff and shot by student filmmakers from MTSU’s Electronic Media Communications Department. The films center on the unlikely cross-cultural exchange between Paris, France and Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The MTSU student-filmmakers traveled there to make these extraordinary documentaries about contemporary French artists, their work, and methodology.
Three-day tickets for this groundbreaking event are $15. Ticket holders have access to all exhibits and workshops, as well as to the film festival and closing-night awards and fashion shows.

For more information and/or to purchase tickets, please visit:
http://www.artlightenment.com

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Gram Parsons Festival/Concert Returns to Douglas Corner

November 3, 2014

 GRAM

Event: Gram Parsons InterNational VII Nashville
Venue: Douglas Corner Café
Date: November 7 and 8, 2014
Time: 6:00 pm
Door: $10/Friday; $5/Saturday w/ tkt from Friday, otherwise $10

Douglas Corner Café again will proudly host the annual international festival that recognizes the genre-bending musical contributions of Gram Parsons—the “Cosmic American Music” artist who died more than 40 years ago, but whose fan base and musical influence grows with each new generation.

The Gram Parsons InterNational VII Nashville festival will be held November 7 and 8 at Douglas Corner, with bands playing Friday night and acoustic/singer-songwriter sets on Saturday.

Performers This Year (not in order of appearance*):

Ray Harris & the BSOBs

Larry Sepulvado and the Sin City Band

(one of the original Sin City Boys and featuring former members The Jordanaires, with whom Elvis Presley and many others recorded)

The Shelby Bottom String Band w/ Barry & Holly Tashian

(Barry Tashian recorded with Gram Parsons. He also played with The Remains, who opened for the Beatles on their final American tour)

Billy Ray Herrin, a close friend of Gram’s from Waycross, Georgia, where Gram grew up

Rachel Brown and the Beatnik Playboys

Tokyo Rosenthal

Donna Frost

Chris Watts Band

The Carmonas

Jerry Mincey, from Gram’s hometown of Winter Haven, FL

The Tangled Hearts

Don Pedigo and Grand Persons

Jacques And The Valdanes

Bobby Dove

Mac Leaphart

Ron Dometrovich

Among several special guest will be Phil Kaufman—former road manager for the Rolling Stones and Gram Parsons—who infamously stole Gram Parsons’ body after his death and burned it in the Joshua Tree National Monument, believing he was fulfilling Parsons’ wishes.

MORE ABOUT GRAM PARSONS

Why does Gram Parsons matter so much to so many Music City and worldwide music fans? Parsons is consistently listed in Rolling Stones’ “100 Greatest Artists of All Time,” but is one of a handful on that list not in either the Country Music Hall of Fame or the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Although he died more than 40 years ago, two premiere music magazines (Uncut and Mojo) did cover stories on him to mark the 40th anniversary of his death. Dead by the time he was 26, he has had more books written about him than many more famous musicians. Currently, there is an online petition to induct him into the Country Music Hall of Fame (begun by Gram Parsons InterNational), which is closing in on 12,000 signatures and comments from ardent fans around the world.

For more information, please visit:

https://www.facebook.com/GramInterNational

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Dogwood Hollow Grand Opening Coming Sunday, October 26

October 21, 2014

dogwood

by Dave Carew

Dogwood Hollow—the new “Storybook Resort for Your Dog” dog-boarding facility—will celebrate its Grand Opening on Sunday, October 26 between 2 and 6 p.m. The facility is within easy driving distance of Nashville, Franklin, and Nolensville, at 9304 Independent Hill Rd, Arrington, TN   37014. The facility will have an enchanted forest/storybook theme.

The Grand Opening—which is free and open to the public—will feature a family-friendly festival atmosphere. Attendees will enjoy light hor d’oeuvres, a fun photo booth, recorded Celtic Music, and the exclusive Dogwood Hollow Boutique.

Also on hand will be several local animal-rescue groups, who will bring adoptable dogs looking for their forever families.

All current customers who come to the Grand Opening will receive a free Dogwood Hollow tote bag, for when Fido comes to stay again. New customers who make a reservation that day also will receive a tote bag for their pooch.

MORE ABOUT DOGWOOD HOLLOW

Dogwood Hollow is a cage-free dog-boarding facility designed like an enchanted forest/storybook world for dogs. Each dog or family of dogs receives his or its own private room. Every loving and caring touch is provided, in order to make a dog’s visit as stress-free and fun as possible. When each “furry baby” arrives, he or she is greeted with a “Faerie Kiss,” a touch of pure lavender essential oil rubbed onto the forehead. This immediately creates a sense of calm through aromatherapy. This is further enhanced by gentle, soothing music, which is piped throughout the facility 24/7.

All of Dogwood Hollow’s rooms are completely indoors. Each dog is personally walked at least three times a day on leash, and also receives playtime in the outdoor play area. Each dog is interacted with and “loved on” frequently, in contrast to many kennels and boarding facilities with indoor/outdoor runs, where contact with humans can be sparse.

For more information, please visit
www.MyDogwoodHollow.com

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

NuVue Eyecare announces “2014 Fall Trunk Show” family-friendly festival

October 7, 2014

by Dave Carew

NuVue Eyecare—the Lenox-Village-area optical and optometry practice—is excited to announce their upcoming “2014 Fall Trunk Show.” This family-friendly festival will be held on Saturday, October 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 6601 Sugar Valley Drive in the Sugar Valley Marketplace on Nolensville Road, just south of Lenox Village.

The popular annual “Fall Trunk Show” showcases some of the deepest discounts of the year on beautiful, hand-made eyeglass frames such as Coco Song, Jisco, Etnia Barcelona, Valmassoi, iGreen, and iGreen Kids, along with wonderfully unique lines such as hand-crafted American-made frames by Frieze and Kala.

“Fall Trunk Show” attendees will enjoy a complete fall-festival atmosphere at the event, including live music, food, wine, a Halloween costume contest for adults and kids, pumpkin painting, door prizes, and chances to win gift certificates to local businesses, as well as free eyewear. The event will be catered by Wholy Crepe Restaurant of Franklin, Tennessee.

A portion of the festival proceeds will go to support Southside Animal Hospital.

ABOUT NUVUE EYECARE

Nuvue Eyecare was founded by optometric physician Dr. David Gavami, and has been serving the south Nashville, Antioch, Brentwood, and Nolensville communities for more than seven years. NuVue has been featured in The Tennessean’s “Toast of Music City” for Best Eyewear and is pleased to provide personalized service and quality eyecare for each patient.

Along with a beautiful optical boutique featuring more than 1,200 frames and an in-house optical laboratory offering the latest in lens technology, NuVue Eyecare offers cutting-edge eye imaging technology, as well as diagnostic tools for the treatment of eye disease that may result from conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma, dry-eye syndrome, and cataracts.

Dr. Gavami sees patients for both pediatric and adult eye examinations, starting with children as young as four years of age. Nuvue Eyecare is located at 6601 Sugar Valley Drive in the Sugar Valley Marketplace, just off Nolensville Road, south Nashville, 37211.

For more information on the “2014 Fall Trunk Show” or to schedule an appointment to see Dr. Gavami, please visit www.NuVueEyecare.com.

Or call (615) 941-2020.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Book review by Roy E. Perry: John Gardner’s “Nickel Mountain: A Pastoral Novel”

September 22, 2014

Mr.-Gardner

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to present Mr. Perry’s latest book reviews to our readers.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

“In December, 1954, Henry Soames would hardly have said his life was just beginning. His heart was bad, business at the Stop-Off had never been worse, and he was close to a nervous breakdown.” So begins John Gardner’s Nickel Mountain: A Pastoral Novel (1973).

Henry Soames, the main character of the novel, is proprietor of the Stop-Off diner in the Catskills in New York State. A morbidly obese, “elephant” of a man, Soames, 42, has already had one heart attack, and he’s forever munching on gingersnaps, Oreo cookies, and cheese crackers—while popping little white heart pills. Ole Doc Cathey warns him, “Henry, do you want to kill yourself? If you don’t cut back on your out-of-control eating habits, you’ll die!”

When Calliope “Callie” Wells, 17, turns up pregnant by her boyfriend, Willard Freund (who hastily leaves town), no one will take her in except Soames, who hires her as a waitress in his diner, and later, although 25 years her senior, marries her. Soon, a child, whom they name Jimmy, is born. Although basically a good man—laid-back, gentle, and easy-going—Henry angrily says of Willard Freund, “I’m going to kill him!”

Gardner peppers his novel with interesting characters: “Bible crazy” Simon Bale, who claims to have seen the devil; skeptical, agnostic George Loomis, who had his right arm torn off in his corn binder; an itinerant “gypsy,” called the Goat Lady, who mysteriously comes up missing; and Old Man Fred Judkins, who, when Callie tells him, “You have to have faith,” replies, “No. You have to have the nerve to ride it down.”

With impeccable poetic prose, Gardner describes the topography and changing seasons—the heavy winter snows and the debilitating summer drought—of the Catskills, and the beautiful scenery between Nickel Mountain and Crow Mountain.

Pervasive in this work is a brooding undercurrent of memento mori—our mortality and inevitable demise. Henry tells four-year-old Jimmy, “Everything living will die.” At another time, he muses, “Maybe you’ll find something you thought a lot of, but it didn’t matter, all you could ever count on for sure was someday your heart would quit.”

In his famous work of literary criticism, On Moral Fiction (1979), “Gardner’s central thesis [is] that fiction should be moral. Gardner meant ‘moral’ not in the sense of narrow religious or cultural ‘morality,’ but rather that fiction should aspire to discover those human values that are universally sustaining.” (Quotation from Wikipedia.com.)

So what universally sustaining human values do we find in Nickel Mountain? It’s a story of our human struggle against doubts, fears, guilt, and follies, and our search for love, friendship, dignity, and respect. In short, it’s a cautionary tale urging us to rise above the “human-all-too-human,” to come to terms with our mortality, and, against all odds, to use the time remaining to us to find a measure of redemption and grace. Beautifully written, and containing much philosophical and theological food for thought, Nickel Mountain is well worth your time.

ABOUT JOHN GARDNER:

Born in Batavia, New York, in 1933, John Champlin Gardner, Jr., was a novelist, essayist, literary critic, and university professor. He was killed on September 14, 1982 in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, when he lost control of his Harley-Davidson motorcycle. He is probably best known for his novel Grendel (1971), a best-selling retelling of the Beowulf myth from the monster’s point of view. Among his other best-selling and widely respected works are The Wreckage of Agathon (1970); The Sunlight Dialogues (1972); October Light (1975); Mickelsson’s Ghosts (1982); and The Art of Fiction (1983).

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

 

 

 

Book review by Roy E. Perry: “Robert Galbraith”’s (J.K. Rowling’s) “The Cuckoo’s Calling”

September 5, 2014

Cuckoo

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to present Mr. Perry’s latest book reviews to our readers.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

The Cuckoo’s Calling (2013) marks the debut of Robert Galbraith (a pseudonym of J. K. Rowling) into the murder mystery genre.

The central character, private detective Cormoran B. Strike, is a massive man with a face like a beaten-up boxer. During his tour of duty for the British military, half of his right leg was blown off by a land mine in Afghanistan.

On a bitterly cold January night, the stunningly beautiful black supermodel Lula Landry (aka “the Cuckoo”)—possessing the flawless face of a Nefertiti and a lithe and sculpted body—jumped or was pushed from the balcony of her lush third-floor apartment, her body broken to pieces on the snow-covered asphalt below.

Convinced that his sister Lula did not commit suicide, attorney John Bristow enlists Strike’s sleuthing services to track down the unknown person whom he is convinced pushed her to her death.

Strike desperately needed this job from Bristow; it actually doubled his clientele. Deeply in debt and recently deserted by the girlfriend with whom he had been living, Strike has been reduced to spending the night on a camp bed in his office.

With the advance payment from Bristow, Strike is able to employ Robin Ellacott, a resourceful young woman sent by Temporary Services. Her intelligence, ingenuity, and initiative provide invaluable help in Strike’s investigation.

The Cuckoo’s Calling is essentially a throw-back to the old-fashioned private eye crime novels. Like gumshoes of yore, Strike is not averse to tedious spadework, which takes him into the enclave of the wealthy.

The novel has no lack of suspects: Evan Duffield, Lula’s former boyfriend; Freddie Bestigui, a powerful film producer; Deeby Macc, a black American rapper; Tony Landry, Lula’s arrogant uncle; and others. Whose cast-iron alibi will crumble under careful scrutiny?

Meanwhile . . . Guilty of three murders, a psychopath is stalking London, and other people’s lives are in peril. Who had the motive, means, and opportunity to commit such atrocities?

With deductive ability reminiscent of Sherlock Holmes, Strike is persistent and precise in sifting through the morass of information he and Ellacott have amassed. Thorough and meticulous—like a dog chewing on a bone until he reaches the marrow—Strike pieces the puzzle together until a clear picture of the killer falls into place.

A thoroughly engrossing, absorbing, and satisfying novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling makes one eager to read The Silkworm (2014), the second entry in “Galbraith”’s Cormoran Strike murder mystery series.

Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J. K. Rowling, international best-selling author of the seven-volume Harry Potter series and of The Casual Vacancy.

 

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Paul McCartney to bestow award on Nashville-based music artist

July 25, 2014

Promo-lg-crop-edge-300x291

 

by Dave Carew

Suzahn Fiering has been delighting worldwide audiences for decades with her heart-felt jazz and Americana performances. (She once even played Nashville’s most exclusive venue . . . my house!)

Now, the internationally renowned touring artist, songwriter, and music educator is about to receive one of her greatest honors—and it will be bestowed upon her by none other than Paul McCartney.

In a recent email to friends and fans, Suzahn wrote:

* * *

I’m happy to announce that Sir Paul McCartney and LIPA (The Liverpool Institute For The Performing Arts) will bestow upon me “The Honored Friend Award” on July 31st in Liverpool, at this year’s graduation ceremony. I will be in the company of amazingly talented students, staff (the best folks in the world!), and other award recipients, who make up some of the brightest and most successful people in music, dance, theater, arts management, set design, sound design, and costuming. Chris Keenan, festival and music promoter extraordinaire (and generally amazing friend) will be joining me from Ireland.

* * *

Underground Nashville wishes Suzahn a wonderful, memorable time with Paul & friends in Liverpool.

For more information, please visit http://suzahn.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.
http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

Book review by Roy E. Perry: J.K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy”

July 11, 2014

 .ROWLING

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

“If God made the country and man made the town, then the devil made the little country town.”
—Author unknown

The Casual Vacancy (2012), J. K. Rowling’s venture into adult fiction, describes the denizens of Pagford, a pretty little country town situated in the West Country (southwestern England), near Yarvil, a larger city to the north.

To tourists visiting Pagford, it appears to be an idyllic place in which to live. But things are not always what they seem. The town teems with dysfunctional people—narrow-minded, untruthful, full of malice and spite. News travels fast in Pagford; there’s a lot of busybody gossiping and there are ample reasons for the gossip.

A sixty-year grudge-feud has raged and festered between Pagford and Yarvil. Two bones of contention are “the Fields” (a squalid slum between the two towns) and the financial viability of the Bellchapel Addiction Clinic which, among other services, dispenses methadone to heroin addicts.

A “casual vacancy” refers to the resignation or death of a member of the town council. When good-hearted Barry Fairbrother dies of an aneurysm of the brain, candidates for his vacant office are thrown into a political struggle between those who are “pro” and “con” concerning the Fields and the Bellchapel Addiction Clinic.

Pagford is hard-pressed to elect a candidate worthy to fill the shoes of the deceased council member, especially when “The Ghost of Barry Fairbrother” makes periodic appearances on the Pagford Parish Council’s website, revealing scandalous secrets that set the gossipy network buzzing.

A central motif of A Casual Vacancy is class struggle, reminiscent of works by authors such as Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Gaskell. One is pained by how the poor people of the Fields are marginalized and alienated by an upper class who disparage their depressed conditions.

There are so many characters in this novel—most of them human, all-too-human—that a chart of who is related to whom, and of their political agendas, would have been helpful. Suffice it to say that the characters are well-developed and the dialogue, although at times eyebrow-raising, is expertly done.

Quite different from the seven volumes of Ms. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, A Casual Vacancy is definitely adult fare. It contains off-color language and erotic “confrontations” that are not recommended for one’s pre-teen daughter (or, for that matter, pre-teen son). Mature readers may find Rowling’s experiment in catharsis more amusing than offensive.

The novel ends in catastrophe, with the tragic death of two of the main characters. It would be a disservice to insert a spoiler revealing their identities.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: Donna Tartt’s “The Little Friend”

June 27, 2014

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Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry, the self-described “amateur philosopher of Nolensville,” wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for thirty years. He is a regular contributor to “Underground Nashville.”

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

Donna Tartt, winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, begins The Little Friend in the fictional town of Alexandria, Mississippi, where the dead body of a nine-year-old boy, Robin Cleve Dufresnes, has been found hanging from a black-gum tupelo tree. At the time of Robin’s death, his sisters—Allison and Harriet—are four years old and six months old, respectively.

The story resumes twelve years later, when Harriet makes it her consuming mission to solve the baffling cold-case murder: “This was Harriet’s greatest obsession, and the one from which all the others sprang,” Tartt writes. “For what she wanted, more than anything, was to have her brother back. Next to that, she wanted to find out who killed him.”

Twelve-year old Harriet, the central character of the tale, frequents the local library and loves Dickens, Kipling, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Her heroes are the super-sleuth Sherlock Holmes and the escape artist Harry Houdini. She will need all her wits, intelligence, and derring-do to survive the dangers that threaten her.

The lion’s share of the book is devoted to interpersonal relationships within the Cleve and Dufresnes families, which have been devastated by Robin’s death. Central characters include Harriet’s father, who has deserted the family and is living with a mistress in Nashville; Harriet’s mother, who has become a shadowy recluse; and Harriet’s grandmother, great-aunts, and aunts.

Four ne’er-do-wells—members of the “sorry,” low-life, white-trash Ratliff family—are the antagonists of the drama, especially one Danny Ratliff, Robin’s “little friend,” whom Harriet comes to suspect as Robin’s murderer. A stash of crank (methamphetamine) hidden in the town’s abandoned water tower leads to a white-knuckle, nail-biting confrontation between Harriet and Danny Ratliff.

Near novel’s end, we read, “Never had it occurred to [Harriet] that she might be wrong in her suspicions about Danny Ratliff—simply wrong. What if he hadn’t killed Robin after all?” With this doubt came a sickening “fear that she’d stumbled blindly into something terrible.”

The Little Friend is a WHO-dunit and a WHY-dunit, with neither a “who” nor a “why.” The story’s promising complications have no satisfying resolution. Was the final chapter inadvertently misplaced by the author or carelessly deleted by an editor? For this reason, I give this absorbing novel four stars rather than five.

A final comment: One wonders how much Alexandria, Mississippi, resembles Donna Tartt’s girlhood home of Grenada, and to what extent spunky, resourceful, independent, tomboyish Harriet is a mirror image of Donna Tartt.

MORE ABOUT DONNA TARTT

Donna Tartt was born on December 23, 1963 in Greenwood and grew up in nearby Grenada (both in north-central Mississippi). She has published three novels: The Secret History (1992), The Little Friend (2002), and The Goldfinch (2013), the latter work winning the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

Chakra Bleu releases sweet, sultry “All of Me”

June 10, 2014

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By Dave Carew

In the early 2000s, when the East Nashville rock scene was infinitely less potent than it is today, one of the bands bravely carrying the pop/rock torch across the river was Chakra Bleu. Described by some as “Nashville’s answer to Fleetwood Mac and Heart,” the band galvanized its die-hard fans with electric female harmonies, soaring guitar solos, and a uniquely uplifting songcraft it dubbed “empower rock.”

Fast forward to 2014: Today the mantle of Chakra Bleu is carried by lead singer/songwriter “Bleu,” who has released a string of solo albums and singles that have lit up Indie and Americana charts. Now—on the heels of the particularly acclaimed Souvenir—Chakra Bleu has released the R & B-flavored All of Me, described by its principal creator (Bleu) as “sweet and sultry with a shake of sass!”

“I aimed for All of Me to embody an exquisite five-course meal, delighting the listener in a savory listening experience,” says Bleu. “That experience includes (1.) soulful songs (2.) rich vocals (3.) lush production (4.) top-notch musicians and (5.) a special dessert, including the ‘empower song’ ‘The Shadow,’ which is food for thought, upbeat, and insightful.”

All of Me features stellar production work from Nashville pro John Billings, who also engineered and played bass on all tracks. Mr. Billings played with Donna Summer and the Monkees, among many others. Another stand-out contribution is offered by saxophonist Dana Robbins, who has played with Aretha Franklin, Delbert McClinton, Chaka Khan, and others.

It all adds up to a welcome surprise for Chakra Bleu fans . . . with equal emphasis on “welcome” and “surprise.” If the “old” Chakra Bleu sounded like Fleetwood Mac or Heart, this entrée is like an Anita Baker album splashed with Bleu’s patented lyrical vibe of love, hope, and good will. It’s a new direction for the beloved artist, and one she walks with inviting confidence.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.chakrableu.com/

 


David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

 


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