NuVue Eyecare announces “2014 Fall Trunk Show” family-friendly festival

October 7, 2014

by Dave Carew

NuVue Eyecare—the Lenox-Village-area optical and optometry practice—is excited to announce their upcoming “2014 Fall Trunk Show.” This family-friendly festival will be held on Saturday, October 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 6601 Sugar Valley Drive in the Sugar Valley Marketplace on Nolensville Road, just south of Lenox Village.

The popular annual “Fall Trunk Show” showcases some of the deepest discounts of the year on beautiful, hand-made eyeglass frames such as Coco Song, Jisco, Etnia Barcelona, Valmassoi, iGreen, and iGreen Kids, along with wonderfully unique lines such as hand-crafted American-made frames by Frieze and Kala.

“Fall Trunk Show” attendees will enjoy a complete fall-festival atmosphere at the event, including live music, food, wine, a Halloween costume contest for adults and kids, pumpkin painting, door prizes, and chances to win gift certificates to local businesses, as well as free eyewear. The event will be catered by Wholy Crepe Restaurant of Franklin, Tennessee.

A portion of the festival proceeds will go to support Southside Animal Hospital.

ABOUT NUVUE EYECARE

Nuvue Eyecare was founded by optometric physician Dr. David Gavami, and has been serving the south Nashville, Antioch, Brentwood, and Nolensville communities for more than seven years. NuVue has been featured in The Tennessean’s “Toast of Music City” for Best Eyewear and is pleased to provide personalized service and quality eyecare for each patient.

Along with a beautiful optical boutique featuring more than 1,200 frames and an in-house optical laboratory offering the latest in lens technology, NuVue Eyecare offers cutting-edge eye imaging technology, as well as diagnostic tools for the treatment of eye disease that may result from conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma, dry-eye syndrome, and cataracts.

Dr. Gavami sees patients for both pediatric and adult eye examinations, starting with children as young as four years of age. Nuvue Eyecare is located at 6601 Sugar Valley Drive in the Sugar Valley Marketplace, just off Nolensville Road, south Nashville, 37211.

For more information on the “2014 Fall Trunk Show” or to schedule an appointment to see Dr. Gavami, please visit www.NuVueEyecare.com.

Or call (615) 941-2020.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Book review by Roy E. Perry: John Gardner’s “Nickel Mountain: A Pastoral Novel”

September 22, 2014

Mr.-Gardner

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to present Mr. Perry’s latest book reviews to our readers.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

“In December, 1954, Henry Soames would hardly have said his life was just beginning. His heart was bad, business at the Stop-Off had never been worse, and he was close to a nervous breakdown.” So begins John Gardner’s Nickel Mountain: A Pastoral Novel (1973).

Henry Soames, the main character of the novel, is proprietor of the Stop-Off diner in the Catskills in New York State. A morbidly obese, “elephant” of a man, Soames, 42, has already had one heart attack, and he’s forever munching on gingersnaps, Oreo cookies, and cheese crackers—while popping little white heart pills. Ole Doc Cathey warns him, “Henry, do you want to kill yourself? If you don’t cut back on your out-of-control eating habits, you’ll die!”

When Calliope “Callie” Wells, 17, turns up pregnant by her boyfriend, Willard Freund (who hastily leaves town), no one will take her in except Soames, who hires her as a waitress in his diner, and later, although 25 years her senior, marries her. Soon, a child, whom they name Jimmy, is born. Although basically a good man—laid-back, gentle, and easy-going—Henry angrily says of Willard Freund, “I’m going to kill him!”

Gardner peppers his novel with interesting characters: “Bible crazy” Simon Bale, who claims to have seen the devil; skeptical, agnostic George Loomis, who had his right arm torn off in his corn binder; an itinerant “gypsy,” called the Goat Lady, who mysteriously comes up missing; and Old Man Fred Judkins, who, when Callie tells him, “You have to have faith,” replies, “No. You have to have the nerve to ride it down.”

With impeccable poetic prose, Gardner describes the topography and changing seasons—the heavy winter snows and the debilitating summer drought—of the Catskills, and the beautiful scenery between Nickel Mountain and Crow Mountain.

Pervasive in this work is a brooding undercurrent of memento mori—our mortality and inevitable demise. Henry tells four-year-old Jimmy, “Everything living will die.” At another time, he muses, “Maybe you’ll find something you thought a lot of, but it didn’t matter, all you could ever count on for sure was someday your heart would quit.”

In his famous work of literary criticism, On Moral Fiction (1979), “Gardner’s central thesis [is] that fiction should be moral. Gardner meant ‘moral’ not in the sense of narrow religious or cultural ‘morality,’ but rather that fiction should aspire to discover those human values that are universally sustaining.” (Quotation from Wikipedia.com.)

So what universally sustaining human values do we find in Nickel Mountain? It’s a story of our human struggle against doubts, fears, guilt, and follies, and our search for love, friendship, dignity, and respect. In short, it’s a cautionary tale urging us to rise above the “human-all-too-human,” to come to terms with our mortality, and, against all odds, to use the time remaining to us to find a measure of redemption and grace. Beautifully written, and containing much philosophical and theological food for thought, Nickel Mountain is well worth your time.

ABOUT JOHN GARDNER:

Born in Batavia, New York, in 1933, John Champlin Gardner, Jr., was a novelist, essayist, literary critic, and university professor. He was killed on September 14, 1982 in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, when he lost control of his Harley-Davidson motorcycle. He is probably best known for his novel Grendel (1971), a best-selling retelling of the Beowulf myth from the monster’s point of view. Among his other best-selling and widely respected works are The Wreckage of Agathon (1970); The Sunlight Dialogues (1972); October Light (1975); Mickelsson’s Ghosts (1982); and The Art of Fiction (1983).

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

 

 

 

Book review by Roy E. Perry: “Robert Galbraith”’s (J.K. Rowling’s) “The Cuckoo’s Calling”

September 5, 2014

Cuckoo

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for more than thirty years. “Underground Nashville” is always proud to present Mr. Perry’s latest book reviews to our readers.

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

The Cuckoo’s Calling (2013) marks the debut of Robert Galbraith (a pseudonym of J. K. Rowling) into the murder mystery genre.

The central character, private detective Cormoran B. Strike, is a massive man with a face like a beaten-up boxer. During his tour of duty for the British military, half of his right leg was blown off by a land mine in Afghanistan.

On a bitterly cold January night, the stunningly beautiful black supermodel Lula Landry (aka “the Cuckoo”)—possessing the flawless face of a Nefertiti and a lithe and sculpted body—jumped or was pushed from the balcony of her lush third-floor apartment, her body broken to pieces on the snow-covered asphalt below.

Convinced that his sister Lula did not commit suicide, attorney John Bristow enlists Strike’s sleuthing services to track down the unknown person whom he is convinced pushed her to her death.

Strike desperately needed this job from Bristow; it actually doubled his clientele. Deeply in debt and recently deserted by the girlfriend with whom he had been living, Strike has been reduced to spending the night on a camp bed in his office.

With the advance payment from Bristow, Strike is able to employ Robin Ellacott, a resourceful young woman sent by Temporary Services. Her intelligence, ingenuity, and initiative provide invaluable help in Strike’s investigation.

The Cuckoo’s Calling is essentially a throw-back to the old-fashioned private eye crime novels. Like gumshoes of yore, Strike is not averse to tedious spadework, which takes him into the enclave of the wealthy.

The novel has no lack of suspects: Evan Duffield, Lula’s former boyfriend; Freddie Bestigui, a powerful film producer; Deeby Macc, a black American rapper; Tony Landry, Lula’s arrogant uncle; and others. Whose cast-iron alibi will crumble under careful scrutiny?

Meanwhile . . . Guilty of three murders, a psychopath is stalking London, and other people’s lives are in peril. Who had the motive, means, and opportunity to commit such atrocities?

With deductive ability reminiscent of Sherlock Holmes, Strike is persistent and precise in sifting through the morass of information he and Ellacott have amassed. Thorough and meticulous—like a dog chewing on a bone until he reaches the marrow—Strike pieces the puzzle together until a clear picture of the killer falls into place.

A thoroughly engrossing, absorbing, and satisfying novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling makes one eager to read The Silkworm (2014), the second entry in “Galbraith”’s Cormoran Strike murder mystery series.

Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J. K. Rowling, international best-selling author of the seven-volume Harry Potter series and of The Casual Vacancy.

 

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Paul McCartney to bestow award on Nashville-based music artist

July 25, 2014

Promo-lg-crop-edge-300x291

 

by Dave Carew

Suzahn Fiering has been delighting worldwide audiences for decades with her heart-felt jazz and Americana performances. (She once even played Nashville’s most exclusive venue . . . my house!)

Now, the internationally renowned touring artist, songwriter, and music educator is about to receive one of her greatest honors—and it will be bestowed upon her by none other than Paul McCartney.

In a recent email to friends and fans, Suzahn wrote:

* * *

I’m happy to announce that Sir Paul McCartney and LIPA (The Liverpool Institute For The Performing Arts) will bestow upon me “The Honored Friend Award” on July 31st in Liverpool, at this year’s graduation ceremony. I will be in the company of amazingly talented students, staff (the best folks in the world!), and other award recipients, who make up some of the brightest and most successful people in music, dance, theater, arts management, set design, sound design, and costuming. Chris Keenan, festival and music promoter extraordinaire (and generally amazing friend) will be joining me from Ireland.

* * *

Underground Nashville wishes Suzahn a wonderful, memorable time with Paul & friends in Liverpool.

For more information, please visit http://suzahn.com.

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.
http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

Book review by Roy E. Perry: J.K. Rowling’s “The Casual Vacancy”

July 11, 2014

 .ROWLING

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

“If God made the country and man made the town, then the devil made the little country town.”
—Author unknown

The Casual Vacancy (2012), J. K. Rowling’s venture into adult fiction, describes the denizens of Pagford, a pretty little country town situated in the West Country (southwestern England), near Yarvil, a larger city to the north.

To tourists visiting Pagford, it appears to be an idyllic place in which to live. But things are not always what they seem. The town teems with dysfunctional people—narrow-minded, untruthful, full of malice and spite. News travels fast in Pagford; there’s a lot of busybody gossiping and there are ample reasons for the gossip.

A sixty-year grudge-feud has raged and festered between Pagford and Yarvil. Two bones of contention are “the Fields” (a squalid slum between the two towns) and the financial viability of the Bellchapel Addiction Clinic which, among other services, dispenses methadone to heroin addicts.

A “casual vacancy” refers to the resignation or death of a member of the town council. When good-hearted Barry Fairbrother dies of an aneurysm of the brain, candidates for his vacant office are thrown into a political struggle between those who are “pro” and “con” concerning the Fields and the Bellchapel Addiction Clinic.

Pagford is hard-pressed to elect a candidate worthy to fill the shoes of the deceased council member, especially when “The Ghost of Barry Fairbrother” makes periodic appearances on the Pagford Parish Council’s website, revealing scandalous secrets that set the gossipy network buzzing.

A central motif of A Casual Vacancy is class struggle, reminiscent of works by authors such as Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Elizabeth Gaskell. One is pained by how the poor people of the Fields are marginalized and alienated by an upper class who disparage their depressed conditions.

There are so many characters in this novel—most of them human, all-too-human—that a chart of who is related to whom, and of their political agendas, would have been helpful. Suffice it to say that the characters are well-developed and the dialogue, although at times eyebrow-raising, is expertly done.

Quite different from the seven volumes of Ms. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, A Casual Vacancy is definitely adult fare. It contains off-color language and erotic “confrontations” that are not recommended for one’s pre-teen daughter (or, for that matter, pre-teen son). Mature readers may find Rowling’s experiment in catharsis more amusing than offensive.

The novel ends in catastrophe, with the tragic death of two of the main characters. It would be a disservice to insert a spoiler revealing their identities.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: Donna Tartt’s “The Little Friend”

June 27, 2014

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Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry, the self-described “amateur philosopher of Nolensville,” wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for thirty years. He is a regular contributor to “Underground Nashville.”

BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

Donna Tartt, winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, begins The Little Friend in the fictional town of Alexandria, Mississippi, where the dead body of a nine-year-old boy, Robin Cleve Dufresnes, has been found hanging from a black-gum tupelo tree. At the time of Robin’s death, his sisters—Allison and Harriet—are four years old and six months old, respectively.

The story resumes twelve years later, when Harriet makes it her consuming mission to solve the baffling cold-case murder: “This was Harriet’s greatest obsession, and the one from which all the others sprang,” Tartt writes. “For what she wanted, more than anything, was to have her brother back. Next to that, she wanted to find out who killed him.”

Twelve-year old Harriet, the central character of the tale, frequents the local library and loves Dickens, Kipling, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Her heroes are the super-sleuth Sherlock Holmes and the escape artist Harry Houdini. She will need all her wits, intelligence, and derring-do to survive the dangers that threaten her.

The lion’s share of the book is devoted to interpersonal relationships within the Cleve and Dufresnes families, which have been devastated by Robin’s death. Central characters include Harriet’s father, who has deserted the family and is living with a mistress in Nashville; Harriet’s mother, who has become a shadowy recluse; and Harriet’s grandmother, great-aunts, and aunts.

Four ne’er-do-wells—members of the “sorry,” low-life, white-trash Ratliff family—are the antagonists of the drama, especially one Danny Ratliff, Robin’s “little friend,” whom Harriet comes to suspect as Robin’s murderer. A stash of crank (methamphetamine) hidden in the town’s abandoned water tower leads to a white-knuckle, nail-biting confrontation between Harriet and Danny Ratliff.

Near novel’s end, we read, “Never had it occurred to [Harriet] that she might be wrong in her suspicions about Danny Ratliff—simply wrong. What if he hadn’t killed Robin after all?” With this doubt came a sickening “fear that she’d stumbled blindly into something terrible.”

The Little Friend is a WHO-dunit and a WHY-dunit, with neither a “who” nor a “why.” The story’s promising complications have no satisfying resolution. Was the final chapter inadvertently misplaced by the author or carelessly deleted by an editor? For this reason, I give this absorbing novel four stars rather than five.

A final comment: One wonders how much Alexandria, Mississippi, resembles Donna Tartt’s girlhood home of Grenada, and to what extent spunky, resourceful, independent, tomboyish Harriet is a mirror image of Donna Tartt.

MORE ABOUT DONNA TARTT

Donna Tartt was born on December 23, 1963 in Greenwood and grew up in nearby Grenada (both in north-central Mississippi). She has published three novels: The Secret History (1992), The Little Friend (2002), and The Goldfinch (2013), the latter work winning the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

Chakra Bleu releases sweet, sultry “All of Me”

June 10, 2014

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By Dave Carew

In the early 2000s, when the East Nashville rock scene was infinitely less potent than it is today, one of the bands bravely carrying the pop/rock torch across the river was Chakra Bleu. Described by some as “Nashville’s answer to Fleetwood Mac and Heart,” the band galvanized its die-hard fans with electric female harmonies, soaring guitar solos, and a uniquely uplifting songcraft it dubbed “empower rock.”

Fast forward to 2014: Today the mantle of Chakra Bleu is carried by lead singer/songwriter “Bleu,” who has released a string of solo albums and singles that have lit up Indie and Americana charts. Now—on the heels of the particularly acclaimed Souvenir—Chakra Bleu has released the R & B-flavored All of Me, described by its principal creator (Bleu) as “sweet and sultry with a shake of sass!”

“I aimed for All of Me to embody an exquisite five-course meal, delighting the listener in a savory listening experience,” says Bleu. “That experience includes (1.) soulful songs (2.) rich vocals (3.) lush production (4.) top-notch musicians and (5.) a special dessert, including the ‘empower song’ ‘The Shadow,’ which is food for thought, upbeat, and insightful.”

All of Me features stellar production work from Nashville pro John Billings, who also engineered and played bass on all tracks. Mr. Billings played with Donna Summer and the Monkees, among many others. Another stand-out contribution is offered by saxophonist Dana Robbins, who has played with Aretha Franklin, Delbert McClinton, Chaka Khan, and others.

It all adds up to a welcome surprise for Chakra Bleu fans . . . with equal emphasis on “welcome” and “surprise.” If the “old” Chakra Bleu sounded like Fleetwood Mac or Heart, this entrée is like an Anita Baker album splashed with Bleu’s patented lyrical vibe of love, hope, and good will. It’s a new direction for the beloved artist, and one she walks with inviting confidence.

For more information, please visit:
http://www.chakrableu.com/

 


David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground
Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

 

Ryan Weaver to play CMA Fest this week

June 2, 2014

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By Dave Carew

Nashville-based Ryan Weaver—the “all-American rockin’ country music artist”—will play two shows in MusicCity this week. He will be headlining a non-CMA Fest-affiliated concert at Margaritaville on Wed, June 4th at 10:30PM after the CMT Award Show, then performing on the Samsung Galaxy Stage in Hall of Fame Walk Park for CMA Fest on Saturday, June 7th at 12:05PM.

Asked by Underground Nashville to comment on his fast-rising career, Ryan said “I have played a few showcases during CMA Fest downtown in the past, but since moving to Nashville and having my ‘Crank It’ music video and song out in the national television and markets, a lot of great things are starting to happen. Now I’ve released my second single, ‘New Set of Tires,’ and become an official CMA Fest performing artist. This is a huge step in the right direction. It’s always amazing to see my dreams come to life after working so hard to get here.”

Ryan’s just-released single “New Set of Tires”—the follow-up to his first Top 100 Music Row charting single “Crank It”—was penned by Hall of Fame songwriters Jeffrey Steele and Bob DiPiero. The single is available for sale on iTunes and Amazon.

MORE ABOUT RYAN WEAVER:

Ryan Weaver served as an active-duty Blackhawk helicopter pilot, Chief Warrant Officer 3, in the U. S. Army. The small-town Florida native jumped into the music scene after a chance meeting with hit songwriter Jeffrey Steele in Fort Rucker, Alabama. Steele soon became Ryan’s musical mentor.

For more information, please visit:
http://weavercountry.com/

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding” by David Hume

May 28, 2014

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BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY:

Editor’s Note: Roy E. Perry, the self-described “amateur philosopher of Nolensville,” wrote book reviews for “The Tennessean” and “Nashville Banner” for thirty years. He is a regular contributor to “Underground Nashville.”

Rene Descartes (1596-1650), “the father of modern philosophy,” was a rationalist who attempted to attain certainty by discovering “first principles” on which he could establish absolute truth. He believed that by reason alone (human understanding) he could “prove” the existence of God and the immortality of the soul.

Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) was trained in the rationalist tradition, but when he read David Hume’s work, the impact shattered his way of thinking. In the preface to his ‘Prolegomenon,’ Kant stated that reading Hume woke him from his “dogmatic slumbers.” If Hume was right, then metaphysics, as Kant had previously believed it, was impossible, nothing but “sophistry and illusion.” In his Critique of Pure Reason, Kant wrote, “I have therefore found it necessary to deny knowledge [that is, reason and human understanding] in order to make room for faith.”

An empiricist and skeptic, David Hume (1711-1776) was born and died in Edinburgh, Scotland. His magnum opus, An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748), like Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason (1781), is one of the key texts of the 18th-century Enlightenment. Taking a dim view of miracles, mysticism, and metaphysics, Hume skeptically asserted that empirical proofs of religion (such as the existence of God, the immortality of the soul, and an afterlife) are not possible. In effect, he was saying (to paraphrase Kant), “I have therefore found it necessary to deny knowledge [that is, reason and human understanding] in order to make room for lack of faith [that is, for skepticism and unbelief].”

In the famous last paragraph of his Enquiry, Hume writes: “When we run over libraries, persuaded of these [empirical and skeptical] principles, what havoc must we make? If we take in our hand any volume: of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance, let us ask: Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number? No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and experience? No. Commit it then to the flames: For it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.”

Hume clarifies the terms “a priori” (deduction) and “a posteriori” (induction). Deductive reasoning is done “before experience,” such as speculating on how many angels can stand on the head of a pin. Inductive reasoning is done “after experience”; it is the scientific method (forming hypotheses, performing experiments, and observing phenomena). The former process, “abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number” (as in mathematics and geometry), produces certainty. The latter reasoning process produces, at best, only strong probability, based as it is on the assumption of “the uniformity of nature” (that the universe will be the same in the future as it is in the present). Therefore, Hume’s “empiricism” is qualified by its open-ended character.

Hume’s “skepticism” is also qualified. Although technically, Pyrrhonism (or excessive skepticism) cannot be philosophically disproven, Hume recommends the practicality of a “mitigated” or moderate skepticism that acknowledges the importance of common sense and common life.

Hume’s Enquiry is, one might quip, not an easy work for our “human understanding” to grasp. This is especially true of his erudite, but daunting, explications of cause and effect. Another challenging chapter deals with the ages-old dispute between determinism and free will. His controversial and provocative essay, “Of Miracles,” caused howls of protest from those accusing him of atheism, and caused him to be forever excluded from a professional academic career.

The Clarendon Critical Edition of Hume’s Enquiry is recommended. It contains a substantial (55-page) introduction by the editor (Tom L. Beauchamp, Professor of Philosophy at GeorgetownUniversity), who explains the intellectual background to the work and surveys its main themes. This edition also includes detailed explanatory notes on the text, a glossary of terms, a full list of references, and a section of supplementary readings.

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

Book Review by Roy E. Perry: “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt

May 21, 2014

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BOOK REVIEW BY ROY E. PERRY

Donna Louise Tartt’s The Goldfinch won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. The judges described this 771-page novel, which took Tartt eleven years to write, as “a beautifully written coming-of-age novel with exquisitely drawn characters.”

At the heart of Tartt’s novel is an eponymous painting, “The Goldfinch” (oil on canvas, 1654) by Carel Fabritius (1622-1654). This Dutch masterpiece, which shows a goldfinch tethered to its perch by a chain on its ankle, is now worth millions of dollars. Shortly after he completed the painting, Fabritius was killed in an explosion in a powder factory in the city of Delft, the Netherlands.

Flash forward three and a half centuries . . . Another explosion destroys a large section of New York City’s MetropolitanArt museum, killing the mother of thirteen-year-old Theo Decker. Traumatized by the death of his mother, whom he dearly loved and who dearly loved him, Theo staggers through the fire and smoke, chaos and debris, of the shattered building, but not before a mortally wounded antiques dealer places in his hands an expensive ring and the rare, world-class museum piece, “The Goldfinch.”

A central theme of this novel is an oxymoronic concept: “the randomness of fate.” An accidental 17th-century “cause” has uncanny connections with 21st-century “effects.” Chance occurrences shape one’s destiny. The story moves from New York City, to Las Vegas, back to New York City, and on to Amsterdam. Haunted by memories of his mother, Theo becomes—as an art thief, in danger of prison—a fugitive, seeking to elude Interpol. Moreover, his life is threatened by minions of the criminal underworld peopled by art thieves and drug dealers.

Theo develops a dark, nihilistic perspective of life: “an unsettling sense of transience and doom”; “the absurdity of human affairs”; “groundlessness and flux, nothing to hang on to”; “chaos and uncertainty of the world we live in”; “the darkness of nothingness.” “All human activity seemed pointless, incomprehensible, some blackly swarming ant hill in the wilderness. . . . For humans—trapped in biology—there was no mercy: we lived for a while, we fussed around for a bit and died, we rotted in the ground like garbage. Time destroyed us all soon enough.”

For readers with a philosophical bent, The Goldfinch provides many such metaphysical and existential musings. Donna Tartt is not only a high-echelon literary artist and stylist, but also a provocative philosopher and psychologist. She challenges us to ponder questions such as: (1) Do our lives, and the existence of the universe, have any pattern, plan, meaning, purpose, or goal? (2) Are truth, goodness, and beauty merely relative—artificial, arbitrary prejudices constructed by our own conceits? Apparently, the answer to the first question is no; the answer to the second question is yes. It’s a gloomy world-view: Life is short. Death is sure. Period.

How can one cope with, and overcome, such debilitating nihilism? What antidote can be found for such skeptical doubt and pessimistic despair? Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch suggests Nietzsche’s answer: “It is only as an aesthetic phenomenon that existence and the world are eternally justified. We have art in order not to die from the truth.”

For other book reviews by Roy E. Perry, please visit:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2MVUWT453QH61/ref=cm_cr_auth/002-6294896-4602409?%5Fencoding=UTF8

David M. (Dave) Carew is writer/editor of “Underground Nashville” and the author of the novels “Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville” and “Voice from the Gutter,” both now available at Amazon.com and XLibris.com. Dave is also a freelance book editor, publicist, seminar and workshop leader, journalist, and advertising / marketing / public relations writer.

************
Everything Means Nothing to Me: A Novel of Underground Nashville by Dave Carew—which was praised by The Tennessean as “beautiful, haunting, powerful”—is now available in an all-new paperback edition. For more information, please visit:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-4818370-7728230?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=David+M.+Carew

***********
Do you want to help homeless people in Nashville learn culinary arts and other employment skills that provide a specific, effective path off the streets? Please visit Lambscroft.org (link below) and consider making a financial contribution. Any amount is very helpful and appreciated. Thank you.

http://www.epiclifecreative.net/LambsCroft/

***********

Editor’s Note: “Underground Nashville” covers artists, authors, musicians, poets, political figures, and other compelling people and happenings not typically covered by the mainstream Nashville media. It also presents reflections and commentary from an underground/indie perspective, offering “thoughts from the shadows of a great American city.”

Dave Carew

 

 

 


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